Self-concept

The teen drama raises questions about gender, sexuality and self-identity.
Have you ever asked yourself, "Who Am I?" So many of us have. This is because we are not our names, nor are we our job titles. These are just labels that are used for convenience and ease of reference. Knowing and remembering who you really are can change your life!
Understanding the minds of children and their development is critical for parents who want to unlock their Parental Intelligence.
Transforming your life involves going beyond the way you live, co-creating a better life for yourself, and changing the way you live. You do this by using your thoughts, visualization, words, faith, actions, or a combination of them.
How we figure out who we are is based on the feedback we get from other significant people in our lives, or reflective appraisal, It is something we all do especially when it comes to our personal beauty. For me, being disabled, with and without the wheelchair, I often have eyes on me.
The simple truth is this: Our self-concept is our destiny. So if we want to change our destiny for the better, we need to change our concept and beliefs about our selves also for the better. We always have the freedom to choose better thoughts.
This study suggests that people feel that their own self-concept is influenced more strongly by what they have done than by what they own. Another series of studies in this paper explores perceptions of self by others.
Too often, we define ourselves by our jobs in this world: "I work at X," "I'm so and so's mother, ____'s wife." But when those relationships have expired, matured or evaporated, what's left?
Parents sometimes ask their children this question when they're acting up or arguing. It's not a sincere question, but rather a way in which parents try to assert control, to put their children "in their place." Sometimes, though, we find ourselves asking this question of ourselves as adults.
You see, what we are telling ourselves, the command to succeed and be someone, is just a story; it's a story based on expectations. It's temporal and finite. It is not who you really are.
You are what you do. It's a case of mistaken identity that is hazardous to your health, life, and even the work you do. In a 24/7 world where we're always on work mode, there's little escape from the identity that's not you.
It is likely that what we take for granted as a "self" does not exist. And since your brand is intertwined with other people's perception, there is no one perception that defines you.
If you look beyond the present moment, you might be able to not only see new opportunities for connection, the person you disagree with might shift his or her perspective as well.
Psychologically, the term Avatar, in my opinion, is interchangeable with the concept of Self (as in "public self" or "persona