Sendai

Coherent action on climate and disaster risk is essential to the success of eradicating poverty.
Autrement dit, la Genève internationale mobilise ses capacités, ses connaissances et son expérience et les met à disposition
The sun has finally appeared, and the TV trucks are rolling out of this ancient hot springs town on the outskirts of Sendai, Japan. This was the location over the weekend of the G7 meeting of finance ministers and central bankers which, although civil, has ended with a lack of consensus.
After a disaster, when stress may be ubiquitous and access to medications scant, routine cases of cardiovascular disease, cancer, lung disease and diabetes can quickly evolve into life-threatening emergencies.
Japan occupies a special place in the recent history of human development because of its early support for the idea that reducing disaster risk is essential if we are to make progress on sustainable development.
Natural disasters, unfortunately, will always be with us. And the cost and number of people affected by disasters continues to rise. But this visit to Sendai is a valuable opportunity for me and the others who participated in the Sendai Dialogue to learn how we can strengthen our defenses.
Located in the path of the devastating tsunami that hit Japan, Sendai Airport was hit hard, with runways covered in rubble
Should a magnitude 9.0 earthquake strike the Pacific Northwest tomorrow, the initial damage would in all likelihood be at least as bad as the devastation in Japan, and the aftermath far worse.
So was my flight from Tokyo to Beijing premature on Day 4? Hardly, for the metropolitan radiation level reached 20 times