senior-housing

"It has Audrey Hepburn, Cary Grant, Paris in living color, and a beautiful score by Henry Mancini," she wrote. "So what's not to like?" Kilgallen's simple, 5-word question sums up my own feelings about the new Housing Plus Services models that are emerging in the field of long-term care services.
The economic upheaval we've experienced since 2007 has really upended our long-held assumptions about employment and retirement. My generation grew up thinking that we would retire comfortably at age 65 and that younger people would naturally come along to take our jobs and keep the economy growing.
Memory care, a care type providing unique and intensive assistance to seniors with dementia conditions, has quickly become one of the fastest growing segments of senior care options. It is also quite costly.
The local community -- whether it is a city, town, county or neighborhood -- plays a major role in allowing seniors to remain independent.
"Aging in place isn't as easy as it sounds." I heard these words recently from a friend who lost her husband less than a year ago. Her face still showed the strain of her years of caregiving, and now she worries that she won't be able to remain independent for as long as her husband did.
Whether a result of denial, limited personal resources or a lack of desire to plan ahead, there is a clear misconception among Americans of the choices available today. Here are some tips to help understand the variety of senior living options and how to assess which ones may be best suited for your loved one.