Senior management

Executives were upset about the newsletter's coverage, so their employees set out to ruin the lives of the couple who ran the website.
The modern incarnation of the interview is out of date and no longer speaks to the needs of companies and the candidates they would like to hire. The current interview has outlived its usefulness and in many ways hinders the hiring process. Simply put, the current interview is dead.
Changing the way your therapists deliver customer service at your spa through training is no easy task. Game of Thrones shows us that the road to success may be rife with drama but in the end for your customers, brand and team, it will be worth the journey.
What if senior management didn't "run" the company? We usually think of it that way, the executives make the decisions and everyone else follows orders. Right? That's certainly how insane asylums are run. It's time to change that frame and start trusting employees.
In his recent address at West Point, President Obama said the U.S. must always be a leader. And yet, leaders of U.S. corporations, so far, have seemed complacent with a lagging status quo.
After a long, dry spell, mergers and acquisitions activity is heating up.
The costs of the failure rate of executives coming into new companies are enormous. So what can companies do to improve the odds of hiring successful senior managers? Let me suggest three steps.
For as long as we can remember, Iago-based business has used a dominator model. Decisions are made by the CEO and senior management, who are retained by investors to represent their interests.
While we evaluate our own response, our local churches' response, and our government's response to this economic crisis -- we must remember that we are more connected than we think.