sensory deprivation

In a loud and distracting world, finding pockets of stillness can benefit your brain and body. Here are four science-backed reasons why.
More: The 5 Things You Should Do Before Leaving Your House Every Morning Like Thrillist on Facebook: www.facebook.com/Thrillist
At age 60 I'd given up hope that I would ever find my One, or even sleep with anyone again, as I was so set in my ways. Then I was stunned to discover divorced, smart, 60-ish, handsome Stan online.
From the damaging psychological and physical effects of solitary confinement to the ethical and legal ramifications of social deprivation, HuffPost Live takes a look at our prison system through the peephole of the solitary prison cell.
Being the somnonaut that I am, I have always been interested in trying to sleep in a R.E.S.T tank. While I was never convinced that I would emerge from the experience transformed into a short, hairy primitive being as in the 1980 William Hurt movie Altered States, I have always believed that the experience could be transformative.
There's been more talk about introversion in recent years. By now many people finally understand that being an introvert doesn't mean that I'm quiet or shy.
Our experience built massive appreciation for our working vision, but we all realized we missed an important aspect. No one else could see us fumble. We were all in it together, with no one to judge our foibles.
Nevertheless, some of the images reflect considerable skill; Fitzsimons recalls a guard admitting that the detainees have
Lawrence Malstaf is an artist who makes unusual designs on his subjects, who he calls volunteers. He literally shrink wraps
We tried to understand, to reason with Eve, but half the time what she was campaigning for with her roaring and writhing didn't even make sense.