sex research

Rhythm holds the key to good sex, a study suggests.
Recently, the internet erupted a bit over the scientific "discovery" that women are "bisexual or gay, but never straight."
Anyone who reads or listens to the latest media reports about pornography will undoubtedly come away with the impression that porn is one of the greatest dangers facing young men today. Adult content is addictive, they say. It causes erectile dysfunction. It contributes to misogyny and sexual violence -- indeed, in the words of Pornland author Gail Dines, adult videos and the like are not like making love, but more "like making hate to women." Scientific research on the actual effects of pornography tells a very different story, though.
Sex is complicated, and the societal taboo about discussing it openly doesn't make things any easier. Sex researcher Emily
Since Christmas is approaching, I'm tempted to say that these books might make good stocking stuffers. But the male ego is so fragile that some delicacy is required on the part of the giver, who must somehow insinuate that she's just trying to improve an already awesome performance.
I don't like the idea that my mind and body are driven by such basic needs. I don't like the idea that businesses can use sex to sell to me or even change my mental state. But it's important for us to look at the truth of human nature, even if it's uncomfortable.
You’re in Prime Baby-Making Time Statistically speaking, this is our most fertile season (especially November and December
Earnestness in a Showtime program full of naked bodies? It's true. Believe it.
Doing crossword puzzles is good for your brain -- but not as good as having orgasms, apparently. Rutgers researchers Barry
Respondents also said the top three requirements for great sex are physical attraction, emotional intimacy and feeling secure