Sharm el-Sheikh

Think sun, sand and snorkeling. ☀️☀️☀️
1. The Pyramids. Cairo suburbs have moved around the 4,500-year-old pyramids, and the approach by road can be disappointing
Wherever you look in the chaos of Egypt today, the finger points at one man Sisi, and one institution the Egyptian army. It is he and it, not "foreign hands" which are at the epicenter of the country's instability.
Officials told the AP about broken scanners and bribes for looking the other way.
The Kremlin said the images are "pure blasphemy."
Britain announced earlier that "well over 20 flights" were scheduled to take its citizens home, but Egypt only allowed eight to operate.
Metrojet Flight 9268 went down over the Sinai Peninsula on Oct. 31, killing all 224 people on board.
Why should it be left to governments and airlines with skin in the game to decide whether to issue flight restrictions or comply with warnings? What is needed is an international governing body charged with enforcing air corridor restrictions or closures, rather than merely issuing protocols and alerts.
While riots, violence, and other domestic and civil disturbances frequently flare up in places like Mexico, Brazil, Greece, Korea, Thailand and many other popular international destinations, American travelers still flock to these hotspots to soak up their sun, tour their sites and spend hoards of money. While this trend may seem counterintuitive, it reflects the successful adoption and sponsorship of a more advanced and nuanced set of strategies and tactics to promote continued tourism to these destinations.
The truth about Egypt is that its recent restlessness is more about internal domestic issues and about a proud and awakened people yearning for freedom and dignity.