shelby county v. holder

Places that were subject to federal supervision in the past still appear to be removing voters more aggressively today.
The Georgia Democrat argued that a 2013 Supreme Court ruling led to voter suppression tactics that targeted people of color.
The NAACP will not stand for this. We are known as the oldest and largest civil rights organization in the United States, but we are just as concerned about the rights of young Americans - a concern that grows daily as we approach November 8.
This is what the dismantling of the Voting Rights Act looks like.
With today's third anniversary of the Shelby v. Holder decision, I am reminded of two poll tax receipts hanging in my Congressional office. On January 31, 1949, my grandparents traveled to the tax assessor's office in Jack County to pay their annual poll tax.
The Supreme Court is under attack. The Court is less popular that it has been in decades. Politicians have called for curbing the Court, proposing measures to strip the Court's jurisdiction and subject justices to periodic retention elections.
Supreme Court victor wanted $2 million to cover its costs in trying to destroy the law.
At one time in our history, it was Southern Democrats that led the voter suppression tactics ranging from poll taxes to violence against blacks. Today, it is now Republicans, who may be wary of expanding their base to remain competitive, that champion this unpatriotic maneuver.
We stand with the President and other defenders of equality in urging protection of the Voting Rights Act. Let's be clear: The recent laws passed in many states to restrict voting rights are not about reducing "voter fraud." They are meant simply to erect barriers to voting for people of color.
Through these five decades, the VRA has remained a valuable and relevant tool because despite substantial progress in civil rights, our work is not yet done. On several fronts, Latinos continue to be the target of efforts to limit participation in the voting booth.
As we commemorate this singular achievement of the Civil Rights Movement and think about the inspiring stories of the people who worked to pass this legislation, the Fair Elections Legal Network (FELN) sought to revisit the numbers behind the VRA's most innovative and transformative provision.
As we gear up for the 2016 election -- the first presidential election since the Supreme Court crippled the VRA's protections -- we need, as President Johnson said, a new triumph for freedom to match any won on a battlefield. On the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, it is time to legislate, not just commemorate.
Far-right extremists are deathly afraid of the growing progressivism among American youth and will undertake any measures to maintain the status quo and keep the power to legislate policies that are based in hatred, bigotry, and xenophobia.
Symbols are powerful, and furling the Confederate battle flag was an important gesture. But symbolic gestures are no substitute for substance. I hope the Legislature will codify the stipulations the state made to the court in order for it to uphold the state's voter identification law.