shiites

On the other hand the focal point of ethnic nationality is not voluntary but by birth and native culture, considered an inherent
For the mostly Sunni rebel groups, the fall of Aleppo would deprive them of their last big foothold in a major Syrian city.
Baluchistan is also crucial because it borders on Iran and constitutes a potential battleground for proxies of Saudi Arabia
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei criticized Saudi Arabia over how it runs the hajj after a crush last year killed hundreds of pilgrims.
Last Month Secretary of State John Kerry traveled to Riyadh to reassure the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states that the U.S. stood with them. "Nothing has changed" as a result of the nuclear pact with Iran, he insisted.
Should military conflict between Iran and Saudi Arabia erupt, the United States might have no choice but to assist its longtime ally. But given some of the kingdom's latest efforts are completely contrary to U.S. interests, do we really have to?
The escalation of tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran is the latest episode in a 35-year old low-intensity conflict between the two regional powers. The competition took off in 1979, when the Shiite Islamic revolution triumphed in Iran.
The Syrian body politic is in the process of slow-motion dismemberment, for the head of state has lost quite a few of his extremities. Yet Assad is clinging to power in this shrunken entity, fearful of what might happen to his physical body if he should leave power, voluntarily or involuntarily.
The roots of Sunni Islam's ailments it must be noted are not entirely to do with religion, as most journalists, politicians and "experts" in Europe and across the Atlantic never tire of repeating. Rather than scripture and theology, it is in politics and economics, in power balances, foreign interventions and the scramble for influence and resources that the causes of its ills reside.
In the days following the decimation of the Iraqi Army during Operation Desert Storm, groups of Iraqi minorities, specifically the Shia in the south and the Kurds in the north, seized on the weakness of Saddam Hussein's armed forces to try and overthrow the Iraqi Baathist regime.
It is fascinating to read the comments that accompany the public debate around the approval of the Iran agreement. It is so obvious that it is better than the current situation that I find it necessary to spell the economic case on behalf of the agreement.
Margalit Fox's Times obituary of Svetlana Boym, the Curt Hugo Reisinger professor of Slavic languages and literatures and comparative literature at Harvard ("Svetlana Boym, 56, Scholar of Myth and Memory Dies, NYT, 8/22/13) discusses one of her works, The Future of Nostalgia.
The prospective Israeli-Hamas truce presents a momentous opportunity, albeit in disguise, for all parties concerned to turn a new page in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and change its geopolitical and security dynamics, which succeeding Israeli and Palestinian governments could build on.
Parliament referred a report to the prime minister and a public prosecutor.
This rapprochement with Hamas also explains, to some degree, the reason behind King Salman's decision to reshuffle his cabinet a few months ago. This and other moves suggest King Salman is more sympathetic to religious conservatives than his predecessor, the late King Abdullah.
Without an inchoate caliphate, ISIS becomes another bunch of terrorists roaming in the area, competing with several others.ISIS can be defeated, and quite readily. It set itself up as an easier target than other terrorist groups when it defined itself as seeking to found a state, governed in line with its particular interpretation of Islam.
If America doesn't have the stomach for such an open-ended commitment -- and honestly, it's hard to imagine a successful candidacy for the White House in 2016 built around the theme, "Let's Re-invade Iraq" -- the options get much more limited. But there are three things that would make a difference.