shirin ebadi

Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, is accused of turning a blind eye to the massacre of Rohingya Muslims.
As manifested in the United States, race and religion are extremely delicate topics for politicians to explore. And eradicating widespread endemic prejudices against certain racial and religious groups is a notoriously explosive proposition.
Shirin Ebadi, the 2003 Nobel Prize winner is an indefatigable Women's Rights lawyer with an illustrious history. Extraordinary in her accomplishments, she is well known for defending and expanding the rights of Iranian Muslim women in her career.
In August 2009, I was betrayed by both my husband and my country. A few months earlier I had left Iran — for good, perhaps
Each year the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates organization convenes individuals and organizations which have received the Peace Prize to address critical challenges to peace. It is humbling to serve the Secretariat of this endeavor and be amongst a group of people, many of whom have faced imminent death threats without permitting fear to deter them.
Today, our campaigns boast a wide range of Iranian personalities across the political and social spectrum, including political activists, human rights defenders, artists and cultural figures. It is rare to see such a diverse group of Iranians come together and support one cause. Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi, prominent human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh, former Foreign Minister Ebrahim Yazdi, women's rights activist Ghoncheh Ghavami and popular filmmaker Jafar Panahi are among these figures.
I have the privilege of working with some amazing Muslim women -- women who run highly effective grassroots organizations or speak out against injustice. Yet despite their achievements, the media seems to always portray Muslim women as victims.
Although the UN does important humanitarian work, it is overgrown with the weeds of a dysfunctional bureaucracy and spineless leadership, and has become a watering hole for states that are prepared to sanction sex discrimination and extremist ideology without fear of serious challenge by the world body.
The announcement of this year's Nobel Peace Prize winner, set for October 11, is sure to make big news. The prize remains the most prestigious in the world. But the award has fallen into an evasive pattern, ignoring the USA's continuous "war on terror" and even giving it tacit support.
Perhaps the Canadians who continue to have diplomatic ties with Iran could also play an important role in this regard just as they did in 1980. Yet unlike the plot of Argo, the story of American relations with Iran cannot afford to end with an escape from engagement.
Over the past two years, since the events in Tunisia which lead to a growing movement towards what many hoped would be more democratic societies, women who have been at the forefront of these movements are now finding themselves left out of the process of creating new constitutions.
Wearing a job lens that myopically sees the human community as a teeming mass of potential customers and clients means you're unable to see all the powerful pathways for change, fulfillment and meaning.
Is misogyny prevalent and gaining traction in the Muslim world and why did most women vote for Islamists in Middle East elections?
Ebadi left Iran after the contested presidential elections in 2009 and has not returned since then. According to BBC, Ebadi
Certain topics have always been hard to talk about--rape and sexual abuse ranking high up on that list. And yet we must speak up more because of the many women affected.
By David Giambusso Religion News Service NEWARK, N.J. (RNS) The Dalai Lama says peace in the world begins with peace in oneself
There is significance in contrasting these two followers of Islam. While we can and do rejoice with Dr. Ebadi for her moderateness
“What has America done? America has limited the work of corporations within its borders,” she said, noting that companies
The Geneva luncheon was carefully orchestrated diplomacy to bridge commonality for President Obama and Brazilian President