Shoah

A survey released on Holocaust Remembrance Day shows major gaps in knowledge of basic information about it.
The problem with a short documentary with so fascinating a subject as Claude Lanzmann, it leaves you wanting more, especially
My (future) mother-in-law is an icon of resilience! Tati, as her loved ones call her, has survived three dictators: her father, Hitler and Fidel Castro.
Today as Christians we have the opportunity to embrace Muhammad, the Qur'an, and Islam in an expression of faith in Jesus.
Two Trees in Jerusalem, which has now been translated into English and is newly available in the United States, is a deeply personal, intimate memoir by a German woman, Cornelia Schmalz-Jacobsen, recalling her childhood years in Germany during World War 2 and the Holocaust, and her parents' highly exceptional actions in protecting and rescuing Jews from the Nazis.
In the recent period I've seen a number of films about the history and legacy of Nazism, most of them German and current, and I read about a new book on two legends of German cinema. The juxtaposition of these events in time seemed coincidental. Or was it?
We Christians can never adequately atone for standing by during the Holocaust, but we can avoid repeating it by doing everything we can to rescue Christians and anyone else being ground under the iron heel of ISIS.
Ernie Hollander and his family arrived at Auschwitz in 1944. He was seventeen years old and on his coat he wore a large yellow Star of David. His mother had sewn it there for him. Ernie and his family had traveled three days by train without food in a crowded cattle car from Iloshvo, a town in the Carpathian Mountains in what was then Hungary.
The documentary follows months, weeks, and days leading up to the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq and months into the subsequent occupation. Shot in Baghdad and the countryside on a lightweight video camera, this electrifying five-and-a-half hour film divides into two parts, Before the Fall and After the Battle.
The story Nemes invents: that of Saul Auslander, a Hungarian member of the Sonderkommando, who when he sees a boy being murdered (apparently his son) becomes determined, and then obsessed, to give the boy a religious burial.