Shunryu Suzuki

I would say his approach was the very antithesis of our typical Western approach to communication, but that's far too limited
I have many, many traits that don't serve me or others well. One of the trickiest to overcome has been my tendency to be a "know-it-all."
Many people still privately yearn for a grand spiritual epiphany that will transform everything, make them forever happy, and solve all their problems.
It's a good time to tidy your mental closet. Toss out some rubbish. Discover some beauty, locked away. You just never know what you might find once you start housecleaning.
Just-awareness is so simple that it is hard for us to see it. It is not actually a thing to be seen, but a reality to be experienced. It is the deepest ease and rest of all.
If we are ever to embrace Buddhism properly into the West, we need to be clear about emptiness, since a wrong understanding of its meaning can be confusing, even harmful.
One Zen monk from Japan who was visiting a Zen retreat center in America observed the enthusiasm and numbers of meditators with astonishment. "How do you get them to meditate without beating them?"
Most religion, including Buddhism, offers an escape from reality, rather than a transforming insight about it. But Dharma is not like that. It is about what is true and real.
I meet many Buddhist meditators these days who say to me, "I've been meditating for decades. When I was young it was fantastic. But it doesn't seem as helpful or useful as it once did."