Sidney Lumet

A seminal event happened to actor Lance Henriksen in his late teens that serves as the perfect metaphor for his life: Henriksen was working at a rural New Mexico gas station, and was taken in by the couple who owned it.
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented.
In 1973, between the first two Godfather films, Al Pacino hung his hat on another iconic film and character of '70s cinema. The film was Serpico, based on the true story of New York City Police Detective Frank Serpico who, in 1971, broke the code of silence.
Frank Galvin (Paul Newman) is a man who has given up. A once-promising honors graduate of Boston College Law School, partner in one of the city's most prestigious firms (not to mention married to the daughter of the firm's founder), Galvin discovered too late that he had the biggest Achilles Heel an attorney can be cursed with: a conscience.
Lumet was the first director I interviewed whose one-sheet posters hung on my wall as a kid. He was an idol, an icon and an inspiration.
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Mamet's certainly ambitious and hardworking, and when I asked her for a dream project, she mentioned a Bond film without
At Middleton features Garcia as a slightly befuddled doctor who finds an unexpected love connection with another parent while accompanying their kids on a tour of a tony East Coast college.
I first noticed Philip Seymour Hoffman's work in a serious way at Sundance in 1998, when he showed up in significant roles in two different films: Next Stop Wonderland and Montana.
While The Company You Keep can't sustain itself as the kind of thriller it's being pitched as, it's still a thoughtful, provocative story about the continuing battle between idealism and cynicism.