Sidney Lumet

A seminal event happened to actor Lance Henriksen in his late teens that serves as the perfect metaphor for his life: Henriksen was working at a rural New Mexico gas station, and was taken in by the couple who owned it.
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented.
In 1973, between the first two Godfather films, Al Pacino hung his hat on another iconic film and character of '70s cinema. The film was Serpico, based on the true story of New York City Police Detective Frank Serpico who, in 1971, broke the code of silence.
Frank Galvin (Paul Newman) is a man who has given up. A once-promising honors graduate of Boston College Law School, partner in one of the city's most prestigious firms (not to mention married to the daughter of the firm's founder), Galvin discovered too late that he had the biggest Achilles Heel an attorney can be cursed with: a conscience.
Lumet was the first director I interviewed whose one-sheet posters hung on my wall as a kid. He was an idol, an icon and an inspiration.
The fim picks up a frightening momentum when one of his drivers (Eyles Gabel), unknown to him, arms himself and then shoots
Mamet's background may be considered privileged -- her parents are David Mamet and Rebecca Pidgeon -- but I found her to
At Middleton features Garcia as a slightly befuddled doctor who finds an unexpected love connection with another parent while accompanying their kids on a tour of a tony East Coast college.
I first noticed Philip Seymour Hoffman's work in a serious way at Sundance in 1998, when he showed up in significant roles in two different films: Next Stop Wonderland and Montana.
While The Company You Keep can't sustain itself as the kind of thriller it's being pitched as, it's still a thoughtful, provocative story about the continuing battle between idealism and cynicism.
I love St. Patrick's Day. It's so inclusive. By that I mean that though it's a bona fide religious holiday, you don't need to be particularly pious to enjoy it. Wishing everyone a safe and (reasonably) responsible holiday, I present my own candidates for the top drinking movies of all time.
Just when you thought the world had enough film festivals! But in addition to discovering new talent, the First Time Film Festival celebrates the old in a unique way.
See the film if you want to solve the riddle or skip it if it is all too familiar to you after seeing your share of Sidney Lumet films which deal with the same theme, but with greater skill.
This was Mad Men's Mt. Everest moment. The quality of the acting and writing, the show's deep substance and the unparalleled directing savvy pushed the ensemble to a new high.
Who's the best director in Hollywood history? You could look at who's won the most Best Director Oscars -- that would be
Duvall can look back with pride on a rich and colorful life, and his contributions to film should never be underestimated, as the following ten titles demonstrate.
If I could get all those black and white haters out there to watch just ten titles -- movies that constituted absolutely essential viewing -- which would they be?
The son of Yiddish thespians, Lumet began acting at age four, made his Broadway debut at 11 and first film appearance at 15. But it was as a director -- first in early live television and later in movies -- that he found his true calling.