sikh turbans

I hope that with awareness and education efforts, less children will be targeted for being "different" and more people will recognize the amazingness of marginalized communities.
No American should have to compromise his or her religious beliefs in order to participate in public activities or make a livelihood, unless the compromise is truly necessary. Shamefully, Sikhs and many other Americans whose religious beliefs are not fully understood or respected, are forced to consider that compromise solely for failing to fit a particular image and look a certain way.
U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson ruled last week that the Army violated Iknoor Singh’s rights when it refused
The Facebook Tips video featuring Vishavjit Singh has been viewed close to five million times, and has attracted hundreds
I follow the Sikh faith, which requires that I keep my hair long and wear a turban and beard. The ROTC recruiters said I would not be able to enlist unless I complied with all Army grooming and uniform rules.
Not fitting in as a literal condition: Too large for cars, Mauni goes everywhere on his trusty motorbike. Demonstrating the
A humor site with 797,000 Twitter followers posted a picture of me in my Trinity basketball jersey and maroon dastaar (it was a home game) with a caption that read: "I'm not guarding him. He's too explosive."
Product by #whatsikhlookslike. My little son pic.twitter.com/M3NiF5J6nk — Manjeet Singh (@mmanjeett) August 29, 2014 Unfortunately
We can all be heroes flying in stealth mode, capturing the hearts and minds of our fellow Americans, leaving no room for Osama's ghost and the racism and xenophobia that continues to haunt us.
As the first turbaned Sikh American to play basketball for an NCAA program, I knew I needed to voice my opinion when I learned Sikh players on India's team were told by FIBA they must remove their dastars before playing at the Japan-India game.
This internal memo is conclusive proof that even government officials hold a patently false view that turbans are associated with a dangerous "other" and a threat to American security and identity.
Prejudice and misunderstanding has run rampant against the Sikh community, all too often singled out for their turbans in
Despite public heralding of the brand new Pentagon rules signaling a renewed commitment to religious accommodation, the rules actually generate more confusion than promise. The Sikh American community in particular wonders, what will America's military finally look like America?
As hectic Thanksgiving week air travel builds, a Sikh group is alleging that the Department of Homeland Security is ignoring reports about airport screening discrimination, including allegations that many members of the faith are pulled aside for secondary screening.
It is ironic that Sikhs, as one of the most visible people of faith, are invisible to the majority of people. While public education may be the solution, our education system bears a large share of the blame.
Sikhs have a rich history of military service across the globe. Meanwhile, U.S. policies still bar turbaned Sikhs from serving in the military.
In the wake of the shootings of Sikh Americans in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, many Americans may silently wonder: If turbans mark Sikhs as targets for hate and violence, then why not take the turban off?
"He said that if he had known who we are, he never would have done it," Singh said. Rupinder Singh, a California health care
It's not uncommon for kids to ask their parents about "that thing" on my head. In most instances, the parents look at me uncomfortably, embarrassed that I might be offended in some way. But recently I had the most amazing experience.