Silent Spring

Although we may not each have Wonder Woman’s superpowers, we each possess the ability to change the world. Each of the women
The Zika threat is causing great concern at the Rio Olympics, with some athletes having chosen to avoid the Games altogether rather than risk infection. But among the measures being taken around the world to combat this danger, one is notably absent: the use of DDT.
Nancy Brinker's determination to fulfill her promise to her dying sister to do something about breast cancer has changed the world. The passion, determination and persistence of women like Brinker have spawned new organizations, fought diseases, and led to the world being a better place for all.
Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey, an advocate who has been called a heroine, died in August at age 101. She joins a list of activist women who have made the world a better place. Match the following women, all of whom have been inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame, with her accomplishment.
In addition to thinking about how we use our resources in our communities, it's important to observe the changes that occur
Let's not refer to pesticides, whether they are insecticides, herbicides or fungicides, by anything but their real name: biocides. Words do matter. What is the word that would encompass the result of our using nearly a billion pounds of biocides each year? I would suggest it is nothing short of ecocide.
“Every day when I woke up this year the first thing I’ve done is check the air quality index on my phone. I arrange my life
Like ocean acidification, this is mostly an invisible problem, but it is comparable in import for the vitality of marine ecosystems and the implication for human reliance on the ocean for water, food, and health in the future.
Birds may be just one canary in the climate change "mine." They are important signals of not only environmental disruption, but also of risks to humans.
Are these technological solutions to some of the damage humans have done to ourselves and the natural world, or are they just versions of Castle Bravo and the Oxygen Destroyer, escalations of a self-destructive technological death spiral?
Rachel Carson died half a century ago from breast cancer, but her words about nature and humanity still ring true today.
It's a plague hard to fight and hard to protect ourselves against -- in part because our regulatory system treats the chemicals as if they had rights; safe until proven guilty.
Musil shows that, although Carson herself worked well with men, her deepest influences and relationships, her love of nature and science, and her influential contacts came from women.
The plagues are a parable. Those who build empires on oppression, who defy divine directives of righteousness, will ultimately find their own lives unlivable. Nature is the agent of this cosmic comeuppance.
Today, fifty years after Rachel Carson's death from breast cancer in the spring of 1964, Carson's influence is intense, her legacy a living one. She continues to be attacked by right-wingers like Rush Limbaugh who hope to tarnish her reputation and hence her political heirs.
The environmental movement progresses in fits and starts. We may win occasional battles, but I sometimes fear we are losing the war and our successes can feel like stopgaps until the next crisis. Are neonics that next crisis?
Livestock producers manage to keep animals alive until slaughter in crowded, filthy conditions only by pumping them full of antibiotics until slaughter. When you buy a hamburger, you might as well be contributing your dollars to biological warfare research -- aimed at us.
Today, Rudolf Steiner is best known as the founder of the so-called "Waldorf School" system, one that is child-centered and
Ocean temperatures along the Gulf of Maine are on the rise. Yet we hear the same kind of skeptical voices that confronted Carson. We should take courage from all that she confronted, and find like champions who defended her work.