six feet under

The "Dexter" actor told The Daily Beast he has "leaned into any fluidity" when it comes to sexuality.
Peter Krause and Michael C. Hall reflect on the series, which debuted 15 years ago.
In the finale of a heretofore brilliant series, we watched as our heroine stumbled off post-slap, tugging at her designer suit, her always perfect hair ever-so-mussed; eyes teary, men gone, mentor betrayed, children confused, career on the precipice, and we, like Peggy Lee, could only ponder: "Is that all there is?"
When you see Hall on stage, he's full of piss and vinegar, but as he sits in his dressing room, barefoot and in jeans, a T-shirt and painted nails, he's reflective and gentle. He chooses his words so carefully that you can't help but hang on to every one.
Is there transparency that others can see in our truth? Will our truth connect us, or will it isolate us from those around us? Does living our truth come with consequences?
Hall as Hedwig is a physical goddess, thigh muscles rippling as she struts across the stage one minute, then the next minute lowers to a full knee bend, crouching and jumping, climbing the side of the stage a second later.
Kill the Messenger is based on the true story of reporter Gary Webb, a Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper journalist in the 1990s who documented CIA involvement in importing cocaine in the 1980s, to help fund the Contras in Nicaragua -- and then was hounded out of journalism.
Transparent, the much-anticipated new series on Amazon's Prime Video, has been met with substantial praise following its pilot release.
When brought to life on the silver screen, the American Beauty script became the Great American Novel, distilling the pinnacle and downfall of chasing the American Dream within two hours.
Jeremy Sisto "Six Feet Under": Billy Chenowith Afterwards: George Altman, "Suburgatory," Peter, "The Returned" Before Jeremy
Oh, and watching Joe Lo Truglio accidentally injure himself never gets old, either. -- Katla McGlynn There's a special place
As part of a valuable experience I was seeking for a story, I worked part time for a week in a funeral home. You know, just to get a feel of what Six Feet Under was like. I have to admit that there is no monkey business to report after a few days, all is calm and regal.
Art, in its best form, allows you to experience life and ultimately changes the way you view the world. Will & Grace was one of those rare television shows to do just that. It was entertaining, but it did more than just amuse its viewers.
Angel Belle was alive during the entire delivery process. My wife felt her kicking throughout. Her heartbeat was strong. And then it was not. After being delivered, Angel Belle took a single breath while her heartbeat slowly faded.
When someone says, "I don't watch TV," I take offense to the snub for the people in the entertainment business and because the nay-sayers are just not giving TV the respect it has earned.
But as I said in this week's podcast, the fact that we get so worked up about finales is, in a weird way, a sign of TV's