skilled workers

But here's the thing, the demographic challenges are real. And the first step involves policy leaders recognizing that fact. Where are the skilled workers? They are on the horizon if we take the right steps.
The skills gap is the popular term used to describe the perceived disparity between those who are unemployed looking for a job and companies with jobs looking for employees. More specifically, it is the mismatch between the needs of employers for skilled talent and the unavailability of those specific skills within the workforce.
A college degree is not the answer for all people. There is a need to boost vocational training for the U.S. population at large. Better worker training means better services and safety for all Americans. Labor unions like the Teamsters make it happen every day.
High-profile promotions like those of Marissa Mayer to CEO at Yahoo, and Sheryl Sandberg to COO at Facebook, suggest that a critical mass of women have found a place in the computer technology industry.
As more and more technology folks end up in the unemployment pool, the U.S. job market is entering a new phase which is related to this particular group. A slew of me-too workers are lingering in the potential hire pool, leaving companies wondering what to do with them.
Take a minute to think about all the people who make it possible for you and I to drive home, cook that turkey, and watch that football game. Let's give thanks for skilled workers and their dedication and hard work.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgMy appearance at TED helped solidify an idea that had started to take shape a year earlier, and the response to that appearance helped convince me that my idea had merit.
The question I'm struggling with this Labor Day is: why do we expect so many jobs to pay so poorly? For the people who care for our children and our elderly, prepare and serve us our food, ring up our purchases, guard the buildings in which we work, and a host of other occupations, our policy response is that these individuals should become more skilled so that they can move out of these jobs
For career and technical education, a skilled workers shortage presents a great opportunity to have renewed and earnest discussions with employers, legislators, post-secondary and K-12 educators.
Do you think someone with an MS in Poultry Science from Kansas State University should be ahead in line to get a U.S. green card compared to a Stanford or Harvard MBA? That is what Congress is likely to propose next month.
Welcome to week one of the "sequestration." Beginning on March 1st at 11:59PM, a set of automatic, across-the-board government spending cuts set to be implemented over the next nine years went into effect.
It has been about a year since President Barack Obama delivered his last State Of The Union Address, so it's about time to
University enrollment has quintupled since the 1990s, with private-university enrollment now accounting for around 25 percent
Seventy-five million young people are unemployed. Yet only 43 percent of employers surveyed say they can find enough skilled workers for entry-level openings. These two numbers frame the story of the dual jobs and skills crises facing youth worldwide.
How can a country successfully move its young people from education to employment? What are the challenges? Which interventions
Conversely, employers say the instruction their apprentices get in college classes is broader than what new workers can learn
The "skills gap" is no big deal now -- but it could be in the future, if we don't take steps to train new workers, writes
The two proposals -- one tailored for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and another for career and technical