sleep and children

A cheat sheet for infancy through the teenage years.
We all want our kids to learn healthy eating habits, to be active and to grow and live comfortably at a healthy weight. Yet for too many children, excess weight is a very real health concern. Too much junk food and too little physical activity are frequently-cited culprits in the problem. But what about sleep?
As we bring 2013 to a close, we're taking a look back at the sleep stories that made news this year. With so many fascinating developments in sleep science, it was hard to narrow it down, but here are the most challenging, eye-opening, important sleep stories from the second half of 2013.
New research shows that a midday nap may play a crucial role in enhancing memory and boosting learning capabilities in preschool-age children.
Every parent knows that having children means losing sleep. This begins with your pregnancy and extends through the course of your childrens' early years, and can exact a serious toll on your physical and mental health.
Except for a handful of forward-thinking school districts, the continuing resistance to starting high school later to accommodate the biological time clocks of teenagers speaks to the attitudes of the adults in charge of our children.
It's important to assess whether or not your child is getting enough sleep. Here are some tips on identifying whether or not your child is sleep-deprived and what you can do to help them get the sleep they need.