sleep and health

It turns out, my aunt and uncle had lied. They'd hidden all the clocks, and what we thought was midnight was actually around
A recent op-ed piece by Timothy Egan in the New York Times, "A Unified Theory of Trump," suggested a novel and I believe entirely plausible explanation for Trump's behavior as a candidate: he is chronically sleep deprived.
We all struggle from time to time with getting sleep. Either we have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or even just getting enough sleep. It's when it becomes a habit that our health can suffer.
It's considered a badge of honor to dedicate hours upon hours at work only to have no energy left to dedicate your time to what's really important. Thankfully, this is beginning to change.
Having a clean room can keep you healthier by ridding your space of dust, bacteria, and other stuff that can infiltrate your sleeping paradise. I've gathered seven tips that you can easily implement into your routine to make sure your bedroom is in tip top shape.
Lack of sleep is linked to several health concerns: With any illness, injury or sniffle, you'll hear one common suggestion
Despite five decades of modern neuroscience, we have only a very limited knowledge of the role of sleep and barely know anything about the role of dreams. Common experience tells us to agree with Shakespeare's simple conclusion that sleep "knits up the raveled sleeve of care."
With our busy lives, it can be tempting to shrug off -- or ignore altogether -- difficulties with sleep. Trouble falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep throughout the night, waking feeling tired and unrefreshed: These are commonly experienced disruptions to sleep for millions of adults.
Most of us are exhausted and don't even realize it. Here are seven ways you can sleep better tonight.
Looking for some help to avoid the seasonal weight gain? In addition to the standard advice, I'd like to add another strategy to the list: get plenty of sleep.
When employees fall asleep on the job, this should be an indicator that perhaps the work system is scheduled in a manner that is incompatible with circadian processes and sleep needs of employees.
If our preferences for sleep and wake times are strongly influenced by genetics and biology, what are we to do when faced with inclinations that don't match up with the demands and responsibilities of our lives?
Don't mistake sleeping more with sleeping better. For the best sleep for long-term health, aim for a not-too-little, not-too-much middle ground.
Poor sleep, and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea, diminish both sleep quantity and sleep quality, and can interfere with the body's ability to rejuvenate cells and bolster immune function. This can result in a less attractive, less youthful appearance.
The relationship of circadian dysfunction to cancer risk is a critically important area of research. With millions of Americans working shifts -- and a wider array of jobs requiring non-traditional schedules -- this is an issue that needs rigorous study and attention.