small-business-lending

House legislation seeks to provide greater access to capital for entrepreneurs by expanding the amount available to small business investments through the SBA's Small Business Investment Company program
Peer-to-peer (P2P) lending is a fairly straightforward concept: networked lending between people who want to borrow money with those who want to invest money. Also known as social lending, this form of crowdfunding is facilitated through specialized investment firms and websites.
A California non-profit has managed to combine the best feature of a merchant cash advance, with the best feature of a conventional loan. The resulting product, called EasyPay, can only be described as cool.
All options for loans have both positives and negatives, as an entrepreneur or small business owner you need to select the option that best aligns with both your long term and short term goals. Explore all possible options and don't ever let funding be a reason that a great idea doesn't come to life.
To get a loan in today's market, small business owners need to not only demonstrate creditworthiness, but be savvy about the loan process. This means understanding the standard process that banks use to assess risk and approve loans.
Applying for a business loan can be intimidating and stressful, and it can be confusing to have an application rejected with little explanation. Three of these steps are described below, and should be completed prior to approaching a financial institution about a loan.
2012-11-13-jrlogo300x60.gifIn communities throughout the U.S., there are 10.8 million stories of small business owners who are on the brink of success and primed to create jobs for themselves and others. Yet, they cannot access the loan that would put them over the edge.
The nature, extent, scope and tone of the pitch have numerous permutations and combinations depending on the scenario.
Small business lending has fallen some at small and mid-sized banks, but not nearly as much as it has at big banks. All of this adds up to what may be the most compelling argument for breaking up the nation's biggest banks.
Next month two budget-neutral economic recovery programs for small businesses will expire unless Congress ends its election-year deadlock and extends them.
I financed several start-up restaurants when I was in the commercial mortgage banking business. All of the non-franchised restaurants failed within the first two years. So I studied the restaurant failures to better understand what it takes to underwrite them successfully.
The salvation for small businesses appears to be the community banks that represent just 10% of all U.S. banks. These bankers live in the community. These are the old-fashioned relationship bankers that want to know about the character of the person they lend to.
Even as recent headlines detail yet one more investment debacle at a behemoth Wall Street bank, small businesses and credit unions continue to carry the water for America's communities and ultimately, our entire nation's economic well-being.