small-business-technology

Cut through all the clutter and I believe that the lessons of 2014 mean that there are five technologies that all small businesses must embrace in the New Year.
I don't do a lot in terms of selling products and services. My small business revolves around providing content to clients, and collecting later by invoicing through FreshBooks or PayPal. However, I know plenty of small business owners who need storefront solutions.
We cannot beg, shame or coerce venture capitalists into putting their money on the table in more diverse regions. But if we stay focused on building our own world-class entrepreneurial ecosystems, we won't have to. It will happen naturally.
To meet the demands of business, it's absolutely necessary to keep abreast of the technological trends driving the marketplace. The challenge comes in when you have to figure out what in the world to do with the old stuff.
Whether or not you agree with MFA, there is one thing these businesses have right: sales tax IS a pain. There are 11,000 tax jurisdictions in the U.S. alone; each state has its own tax rules; and businesses that don't get it right can face stiff penalties. Trying to manage sales tax in multiple states can be like trying to steal a kiss from the meter maid: it's hard to do and it's risky.
The American shopper has drastically changed their habits in just a few years. People are mobile and so are their shopping behaviors whether they are paying online, at home, walking down the street or in the physical store.
Historically, technology choices have been the domain of the CIO, however, with BYOD trending and new consumer-inspired enterprise applications entering the market, the sales force too is pushing the technology agenda with their CMO.
All of this can be done with the click of a button (or a tap of screen). But navigating the seemingly endless list of business tools on the market can become more of a time sink than an efficiency boost.
What if you have an idea for a company that is not technology-related, is not going to revolutionize the way people socialize, communicate, shop, or -- gasp -- is an actual brick and mortar business? Can it be done and do you have a shot?