Smallpox

Smallpox was eradicated in 1980, but there are at least two remaining stores of the virus: one in the U.S., the other in Russia.
Why vaccines are simply one of the best tools to build stronger communities and economies.
The epidemic of gun violence in America demands action, but what action?
A disease detective calls out the world's apathy toward forgotten illnesses.
One of the biggest tragedies for African-American fathers is the lack of faith in our parenting abilities, but here’s a refreshing
I keep wondering, in what seems the new, emperor’s-new-clothes-like surreality: where have all the grown-ups gone? Where
It is now "cool" to be willfully ignorant. Any sentence which begins with "I'm not a scientist," but ends with public policy suggestions regarding it, highlights the point. Ignorance has become a homeowner in America's discourse. It has a seat at the "grown folks" table and is asked its opinion. How in the hell did we get here?
We've done it before. In 1980, the world wiped the devastating disease smallpox off the face of the earth -- making it the only human disease eradicated in history. So what does it take to destroy another human disease again?
Sydney-based artist and photographer Alexia Sinclair recently agreed to help The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation send a powerful message. Over the course of several months, she planned, prepared, and captured an image that tells the story of Dr. Edward Jenner's Smallpox Vaccine Discovery.
If we would get the Ebola vaccine that exists somewhere in the future, then we need to examine our reasons for not utilizing the vaccines that exist right now.