smartphone addiction

It is easy to get too attached with your phone, as it gives you the whole world underneath your fingertips, but does it really? Here are some of the signs that you are spending too much time using your smartphone.
The baby boomer generation has witnessed technological advancements and changes as never seen in humanity's history. We have
Our gadgets are not inherently demonic and, with due respect to Joni Mitchell, our children are not merely "cellphone zombies" who "babble through the shopping malls." The kids are alright, or will be, if we we soundly reject the equally misguided cries of "tech will save us" and "tech is evil."
If you have never been without your phone, give it a try for a couple of hours a day. Next time you meet some friends or family members for dinner, leave your phone at home. Break free from the ball and chain. Fully engage with your life and the life of those around you. Not with your phone's 'life.'
The authors of "Prefrontal Control and Internet Addiction" write, "Some individual suffer from a loss of control over their
The smartphone keeps us on automatic pilot and it inhibits us from making healthy choices, thus we are responding to life on an automated and unconscious neurobiological basis. We socially isolate, are intolerant of boredom, and are always connected somewhere other than where we actually are at the moment.
Compulsive Internet use has been linked to depression and anxiety.
Addiction is a strong word. I've never been addicted to anything. I've never done drugs. I don't drink so it's never been able to get excessive
Nearly half of smartphone users say they "couldn't live without" their devices.
More and more, the top brass is losing their patience with bad manners and poor work habits due to the misuse of technology in the workplace. Here are the top-ten bad calls managers would like to see employees avoid.