sncc

On Saturday October 29, 2016, surrounded by wife Barbara, sons Liam and Troy, and 200 family and close friends, Tom Hayden's
But in Chicago, like in New York, I also saw a vibrant city, where races mix, at least on the L and in the street and parks
The time for silence and patience is long gone. Congressmen Lewis and his colleagues have vowed to keep going with their fight as soon as the House returns from its July 4th recess. We must stand with them as they continue to get into "good trouble."
The trio had been stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, and they had just been informed they were going to Vietnam. They were given a 30-day leave before they had to embark. The G.I.'s convened the press conference to perform a bold act: they intended to refuse their orders to go fight.
John Lewis has been my congressman for decades ... and my hero for even longer. By which Mr. Lewis means that change requires
Mississippi's current political leaders travel to the beat of a different dumber. Whenever another state does something particularly outrageous that threatens to lead it to claiming the title of worst, Mississippi can be counted on to save it by doing something worse.
As I survey American political landscape in the context of the current election for President, I cannot but notice the absence of Black Lives Matter from the front lines of this important battle for power.
Even many liberals -- black and white -- thought that they were too radical. But their actions galvanized a new wave of civil rights protest. But this is how people make history.
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Vernon Dahmer being killed by the Ku Klux Klan. On January 9, 1966, Vernon Dahmer announced on the radio that he would pay the poll tax for anyone who could not afford to register to vote.
This week marks the 50th anniversary of the release of a powerful statement of protest against the Vietnam War.
What has erupted proves the case of the continued need to build cultural competencies across Yale and indeed across all campuses and communities. We don't have to, don't warrant this. But should we all not embrace that awesome challenge we may forfeit the future that is ours to own and make better.
Since the recent publication of Simone Zelitch's fourth novel, Waveland (The Head and the Hand Press), there have been such a spate of racist and violent events in this country that one could be forgiven for believing we are still somehow mired in the hate and horror of the early 1960's.
Bond's colleagues look back on the activist's place in civil rights history.
America has lost a great leader, and many of us have lost a good friend. For those of us becoming active in the movement -- especially those of us in the South -- Julian Bond was an absolute hero.
As residents of Maryland and the nation brace for what could potentially be another night of civil unrest in Baltimore, it is important to pause and reflect on what has brought us to the current moment.
History will credit SNCC, SCLC, CORE, NAACP and many local organizations throughout the South in many campaigns, to get the Voting Rights Act passed in 1965. SNCC in Montgomery was a training ground in discipline, survival and how to channel anger into winning strategies through organization and confrontation.
There is a "people's history" of Selma that we all can learn from -- one that is needed especially now.
In 1964, at the height of the civil rights movement, the great organizer Ella Baker said: "Until the killing of black men, black mothers' sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother's sons, we who believe in freedom cannot rest."