social commentary

Aniebietabasi Ekong, known to the Internet as baddieani, is a whole new breed of artist, the kind that that could only exist in the Internet Age.
If society actually does care about you and the one-eyed snail, it's nowhere near as much as people praise hot chicks and the omnipotent V.A.G. Online lists abound of all sorts of female fuckables and you're just feeling . . . left out right?
Of course, newsstand magazines can be expected to put attractive -- impossibly attractive, computer-altered -- models on the cover. But with reader reactions being what they are, maybe it's time to reconsider how our community is framing itself.
It is alarming how easily I was lulled into the comfort of believing I had an infallible friend on board; an all-seeing, all-knowing, road omnipotent that could make all the right choices for me, leaving my brain free to ponder the myriad of other distractions that confront me when I am driving.
I want to be like the man on the subway who told the operator about the woman's seizure, because as soon as he did, people followed suit and offered help. We have the power to choose whether to justify passivity or actively decide to do the right thing, and as a society I believe we ought to break free from our psychological tendency to just stand by.
The last thing we need is a boo-hoo-everything-sucks-camp.
I challenge you to help me decide if the future predicted by these cards has arrived. I'll share my predictions. Feel free to add your own. OK, here goes.
There is no way you can argue with me that it is ever okay to throw anything on the ground. Even if you hand me free Nickelback tickets, I will happily walk them to the nearest garbage.
A typical day for me starts out with me turning off the alarm on my smartphone and immediately taking the opportunity to check all my texts, instant messages, emails, status updates... you get the picture.
Some part of me wants to tell people to stuff their phones in their pockets and stand in front of an incredible piece of art and just be. Breathe and feel what the art brings forth in you. All of the emotions are not comfortable, but they're important to feel. Or at least I think so.
As we prepare to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and acknowledge the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act and the Selma March, we also must acknowledge that we are still not a harmonious nation - or world - a half-century after these two central events in the history of civil rights.
Evidently the real dangers to society are those at the top of the social hierarchy, those whom appear to be innocuous and hide in plain sight. As current events have shown, this is a woefully true observation.
I am glad for the disarray of our coffee table. Maybe it's a little raft in a world too full of conventional politics, a raft salvaged from cast off pieces, caught in the currents of a deeper wisdom, a more authentic quest for freedom.
I arrive at Zumiez, but rather than being confronted by a packed window display of knockoff shoes, I am greeted by the words of a large sign: "Forever in Our Hearts."
I've had male friend after male friend in my life, and it always goes to sh*t because it's impossible to just be friends. I mean REAL friends with openness and freedom.
I love long titles! They give you the gist of the article without spoiling the confusing, condescending points to follow.
Until recently, no editor ever encouraged me to write for the skimming, scanning, browsing, not-actually-reading "reader."
I was so blown away by Elysium that I need two reviews to describe why I think it's the best movie of this summer by far, and probably of 2013.
The action and, surprisingly, the political and social commentary that seems to criticize republican ideological dogma still has me pondering what I thought would be a run-of-the-mill slasher movie.