social contract

The recent U.S. election exposed two major intersecting fault lines in America that, if left unchecked, could soon produce an era of social and economic upheaval unlike any in our history.
Consider the challenges you will face? My optimism about the future is grounded in my personal experience as an anthropologist
More vomiting. What's more, there were very few nibbles out there in the ocean's vast emptiness. As we turned around and
Larry Summers(!) and Hillary Clinton called for a "rethink" on trade. Amen. The sooner the better. Years after CAFTA, Guatemala
As progressive thinkers and prudent business leaders increasingly recognize the need to strengthen the basic safety net and
When we stop trying to define the truth for others we can begin to appreciate to what extent the society we inhabit is an ongoing negotiation between the secular and the religious. The social contract keeping the peace between us proves only as tolerant as the quid pro quo that guarantees its citizens' mutual survival.
Sixth, the rich and enfranchised already are in pretty good shape. So, when we make policies, or allocate resources, the
The NYC Mayor's Office of Tech & Innovation has asked for bold ideas and innovation to "help bring high speed Internet to all New Yorkers", including "more choices among ISPs", and "expanded service to underserved communities", which may require "policy changes".
Over the last two decades there has been a continuous pattern of throwing money, our money, at broadband again and again. Ironically, instead of taking on the companies, many times these additional funds can end up in the hands of the same companies.
Soul is about human connection. Soul is about deep feeling, about self-knowledge and empathy. As my Songhay friends in West Africa like to say, a soulful quality makes life sweet, which, in turn, sweetens the quality of life in the world. My students remind me that without soul, there is no social contract and no social harmony.
Net Neutrality itself doesn't solve America's communications problems and we hope that the FCC decides to actually investigate our claims that a) Verizon failed to disclose that the networks are already Title II.
The Public Interest has been tarnished, stained and harmed and it is time for a course correction of oversight, accurate data, investigations and enforcement of the laws. It is time to not only re-evaluate the public policies that govern communications services in America, but fix what's broken -- finally.
By 2010 or there abouts, America was supposed to have been a fully-fiberized nation with fiber optic-based broadband utilities -- really.
Besides the fact that you can never, ever get the advertised price, or that the bill now includes a collection of made up fees and pass-through taxes, there are also a host of related issues that surround the sale and promotion of these services.
You can never, ever get the advertised price because it doesn't include many of the fixed costs, like the set top box, not to mention it is littered with pass-throughs of the company's taxes and fees, including the cable franchise fees.
Despite the sound public finances, robust economic growth and low unemployment over the past decade, Singapore has not successfully tackled the growing problems that have the potential to tear apart its social fabric.
Jews around the United States have had reignited (for lack of a better phrase) the prophetic aspect of their communal leadership. Rabbis are standing, walking, preaching, and lobbying with interfaith coalitions and political alliances to save live from the scourge of gun violence.
The problem with arguments against aid is not that they lack fiscal appeal or past evidence -- nobody wants to waste money abroad while the budget is being cut at home. The problem is that they belong to a world that doesn't exist anymore.
What a difference a year makes. Last year at this time, a president and a party who had just won an election with progressive rhetoric were quickly pivoting toward a "Grand Bargain" which would cut Social Security and Medicare. Today the forces of corporate consensus are on the defensive.
What most Americans seek and deserve is not unreasonable. They want a renewed social contract -- a national agreement and practice that rewards honest, hard work. I suggest an approach called the American Invest for Success Program.