social studies

The school board will vote on accepting Dayanna Volitich's resignation next week.
It's hard to teach history that isn't quite history yet.
Our democracy depends on those of us who teach kids.
Students may be learning about the mechanics of government, but they are not always required to learn the skills needed for civic participation.
Follow Alan Singer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReecesPieces8 I like Costello's ideas. This weekend, The New York Times
How do you teach about the Presidential election in a responsible way when you know that one of the major party candidates makes statements that are biased, incendiary, insulting, and so out-and-out false that many members of his own party refuse to support his candidacy?
Michael (Social Studies): This semester was my second chance to student teacher because of medical issues the first time
Mr. Trump, you have put me in a precarious position as a professional educator. My ability to remain neutral, as you brazenly assault the American values I have spent my career promoting, became more difficult every time you found a microphone.
A popular aphorism attributed to philosopher Georg Santayana is "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat
I've lost track of the other students in Miss Rankin's social studies class, but I would be interested to hear their reflections on our shared experience. Perhaps a few would agree with me: while we were busy memorizing all those counties, we missed some of the most important lessons of our day.
Most of the candidates in the Republican and Democratic Presidential primaries look for scapegoats to blame, claim they can govern better or smarter, promise to make America great again, or play ostrich with its head in the sand ignoring real problems altogether.
As a member of the New York State Board of Regents I will fight for social justice and what I believe are the educational needs of children. I promise to listen to everyone and seek out diverse viewpoints, but ultimately as an educator and as an educational activist I have to work for the things that I believe in.
Picture book crafting challenges me to depict life in its simplest forms. At the same time the craft is multi-dimensional. I've always enjoyed paintings which tell several stories captured in a single frame.
No matter what your score, I wanted to make the point that for the most part, students are not given the opportunity to discuss important issues, concepts, and personalities related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) issues in the required curriculum in the K-12 classrooms of the United States.
The internet isn't turning us into lonely hermits, but unlike say in elementary school, you're not necessarily going to be friends with people just because you may see them everyday.
Dear Teachers, How do we explain the horrific and how do we engage secondary students in meaningful discussions of very disturbing events? Should we focus narrowly on the issues presented in media or do we encourage students to place them in a broader historical context?
Each year, schools struggle with what to do on September 11. Some teachers choose to do nothing. Other educators address 9/11 as part of United States history. While many teachers hold a moment of silence in honor of the heroes and victims.
My advice to teachers and school administrators this fall is to ignore the unit sequence in the Common Core aligned ELA curriculum. If someone complains, explain that you think it is more important that the ELA and social studies curriculum be coordinated so they make sense and support student learning.
Pearson promotes Common Core and Common Core creates markets for Pearson. Teaching history the Pearson way means teaching it the Common Core way, without any meaningful content. The text, no matter how inaccurate or misleading, rules. Myth replaces history.