socialized medicine

A friend of mine recently shared a Vox article written by a self-proclaimed progressive dude titled, “Democrats should start
Imagine if the upcoming national election hinged entirely on whether or not San Francisco General were to be provided funding to add a diagnostic lab.
When President Truman presented a proposal for national health insurance, he emphasized that this was only a financing mechanism and that the delivery of health care would remain in the private sector's marketplace of hospitals, other facilities, physicians and other health professionals.
Sanders has reopened the health care debate by urging the U.S. to adopt a system more like that of other wealthy countries. In Sunday night's Democratic presidential debate in Flint, Michigan, he said, "When we talk about Europe and their pluses and minuses, one thing they have done well that we should emulate ... is guaranteed health care for all people." Even though he's right, his health care platform is under attack, not just from the right, but also from the left.
I respond with, "ah oui, I didn't know that!" "It's the problem with the tiers payant," he answered, "they make is so cheap
No one I know ever threatened another person with a gun. The few violent men I knew fought with their fists. Pulling a gun to settle a score wouldn't be worth the shame. Guns were for targets and critters. It seems like some kind of mythical world now.
When I was an industry PR guy, I was part of a never-ending effort to defame the NHS, usually by citing a few anecdotes about Brits who claimed to endure long waits for needed care. The industry's propaganda got little resistance from the media or the American public.
I'm not at all suggesting you give up your viewpoints or your beliefs. Feel free to hold on to any point of view you want. And continue to argue and fight for them. Just don't claim that yours are true and that someone else's is false. None of them are "the truth." And it's fine to prefer one to the other.
Regardless of your general disposition toward the president, let's make sure your anger isn't just a little bit misguided.
The point is not that the British, or Canadian or any other system is necessarily the exactly right model for the U.S. But we will never get anywhere near the right model unless the ideological fog that clouds our political discourse on health care is lifted.
A lot of conspiracy theories have been floated around the Affordable Care Act, including that it creates "death panels." Sen
Sen. Orrin Hatch says Democrats expect the Affordable Care Act to fail, and will replace Obamacare with a single-payer system, which he says is "socialized medicine."
As the Republican Party continues to harp on the socialist leanings of President Obama, maybe we need to turn our sights to other areas of socialist policies in this nation that no one openly talks about. Clothing, for example.
The pressure is on. Newly medically-uninsured, I must take a deep breath and dive into this project of figuring out what I'll do when the medical needs demand strike.
Can you imagine the reaction on the right if an Obama-supporting Super PAC ran an ad featuring Canadians demanding higher taxes on the rich? Cries from the Fox News cabal about filthy foreigners tampering with the sacred trust of American elections would be positively deafening.
Here, people lose their houses and their property when they get sick, if their coverage is insufficient or non-existent. Here, too many people think that their neighbor should not have the right to see a doctor unless he pays for it. "Why should I cover that guy's bills? He can go to the emergency room!"
In the short time I have lived in the U.S., I've heard much about the horror of the socialized medicine systems in other countries. Interestingly, all these comments came from people who never lived in such countries.
Who do they think they are forcing me to have health care when I don't want it? That's it. I'm packing my bags and moving to Canada. I'm really doing it this time too.