sodium

There is a genetic basis for your salt cravings.
A familiar nursery rhyme to die for. The year is 1346. An estimated 75 to 200 million Europeans are being wiped out by bubonic
Eating at restaurants led to an average increase of almost 200 calories per day, and fast food diners saw an increase in their sodium and total fat daily intake.
You might want to take the latest campaign to reduce our daily consumption of sodium with a grain of salt. On second thought, maybe you shouldn't.
Risks of too little sodium are a valid concern only at levels massively below mean intake in the U.S., while the harms of excess are with us right now. The priority, obviously, is fixing what's broken. Kudos to the FDA. Their action on salt does not yet have traction in the real world -- but it does pertain to it.
We can hope for meaningful food supply-wide sodium reduction 50 years after the scientific evidence for the need had become convincing. In the meantime, the subtle but devastating effects of high-sodium diets will continue to take the lives of tens of thousands of people and waste billions of dollars annually.
This all leads to one of Dr. Lichtenstein's top pieces of practical advice: At the grocery store, check out the sodium level
Aesthetically speaking, the new label is easier to read than its predecessor was. Scientifically speaking however, the new label provides an array of new and important information; information that is particularly appealing to nutrition and public health professionals such as myself.
In Washington, D.C., the Food and Drug Administration is expected to ask the food industry to join together to voluntarily
I've always been lucky enough to have very low blood pressure. So when dinner companions cautioned me about the health risks