Soft power

The off-Broadway musical's cast album will be released Friday. HuffPost has a first listen to one of the songs.
The "play with a musical" takes a satirical look at being Asian in modern America.
"Hate Crime and Islamophobia Increase After Trump Victory." A few days after the U.S. election, that was the lead headline
The soccer soft power contrast between Qatar and Iceland speaks volumes. A comparison of the strategies of both countries
While in the U.S. this week, Suu Kyi is being applauded as a Nobel Peace Laureate and champion of the oppressed, her authority, mostly moral and political, but non-military, remains fragile at best. Without dedicated U.S. support for years to come, Myanmar stands to crumble as a patchwork of diversity and revert once more to authoritarian rule.
Nations such as South Korea, Indonesia, Singapore, the Philippines, Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam and others all keep a close eye on China, but they also know that they individually and especially collectively possess enough economic and political vitality to offset some of China's regional dominance.
Undeniably, the use of soft power has become an important element of China's contemporary foreign strategy, and has been
At times when the church had been losing influence, his commentaries on such pertinent issues for younger generations, has
It's a simple, honest logic that, increasingly, is the one that is being adopted by soft power networks the world over. Trident is a gateway issue for a new transnational politics that, if fostered, will give us the security we yearn for.
We have all come across the terms hard power and soft power as generic descriptions of various government policies and behaviors around the world. Hard Power is probably the one we are most familiar with, as it seems to manifest itself in news headlines most days.
Done well, digital diplomacy ought to be the use of technology to deliver soft power and public policy messages, alongside the ability to engage with wider audiences of both state and non-state actors and use that feedback loop to understand more and to deliver better policy.
Joseph Nye is a University Distinguished Professor at Harvard University. He was also the former Dean of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, and an Assistant Secretary of Defense under the Clinton administration.
In a series of peculiar events that can only be contextually placed in the reality of the 21st century, football, war, and diplomacy meet and intertwine. Today, Russia and the U.S take one more step in their very own modern adaptation of the Cold War in the curious battlefield of international soccer.
Kenya is preparing to host a summit to counter violent extremism in June 2015. A timely and vital initiative by a country reeling from tragic terror attacks.
Harvard professor Joseph Nye, well known for his explorations of soft power, considers the American prospect in his newly published book, Is the American Century Over? His answer is a carefully constructed "No," which is based partly on the fact that there is no logical successor to convincingly claim dominance over the next century.
Japan is determined to be a force for peace and stability in the war-torn Middle East, yet until and unless its constitution is changed to permit the country to project its power in a meaningful manner militarily, its ability to influence events in other regions of the world will remain limited.
Weeping mothers are not usually embroiled in international crisis, nor are they typical foreign policy advisers. But now is the time for the Shinzo Abe government to listen to Mrs. Ishido. Less political outrage, more national contemplation.
While American patriotism -- the love of one's country -- is "awesome" in more ways than one, American nationalism -- the belief that America is the "greatest nation on earth," with the "greatest military power", and the "greatest ideals" -- can become dangerous.
Talk these days of the creative economy as soft power and a harbinger of world peace, ignores the huge struggles taking place between Google, Facebook no one hand and Baidu, We Chat, Tencent on the other, pitching the U.S. and China directly against each other in a cold digital war of online platforms, search engines and aggregation algorithms. It is very nice to assert the diversity of cultures in a globalized world. But this diversity is in reality dependent on some very hard issues of finance, intellectual property rights and communications infrastructures.
hile Putin uses the whole spectrum of power tools, he forces us to ask questions about our own poor, soulless, haphazard, and anemic conduct. Why is it that we are so poorly equipped to use the whole set of power tools at our disposal to counter him? The West can do better.