sojourners

In a new video, 10 pastors lament the harm churches have done to sexual assault survivors -- and seek new ways to move forward.
Some environmental justice leaders seek inspiration from the holy books. Ibrahim Abdul-Matin is the Director of Community
You can look back in history and criticize Christians for failing to follow Jesus during some of the world's darkest moments, but today's Christians will also be judged according to their actions, and here are four moral questions facing today's Christians.
While I am no legal expert on the details of the court decision yesterday or whether the charges against him and each of the other officers were carefully made or effectively prosecuted, nor a spiritual expert on the officers' motives, nor an administrative expert on Baltimore police training, one fact continues to remain clear: No one has yet to be held accountable for the death of Freddie Gray who was alive and well before being detained and put into that police wagon. That same fact still applies to almost ALL of the young African-American men and women who have been shot or choked or beaten to death by police or who have died in police custody --despite all the publicity about these police crimes. And that is why there is so little trust in communities of color for the police that are supposed to serve them and keep them safe.
I'm not sure Donald Trump has the personal conviction to be a racist. He just sells racism -- and that's worse. Trump's racial, religious, and gender bigotry will lose him many religious Americans, including those whom the media has often called "values voters."
His critics always accused him of disorderliness, disruption, creating drama, and causing discomfort -- all of which were true. That's because he was not only a priest and a poet -- Daniel Berrigan was a prophet.
In the midst of a sexist and even misogynist conservatism that calls itself "Christian," and a secular left that too often discounts the value of faith in the public sphere, we desperately need women faith leaders.
What does being pro-life mean in a world in which giving birth to new life causes so many women to lose their own?
It's been nearly 2,000 years since the birth of Christianity, people. It's time to let women lead.
In Sojourners, the stimulating new Playwrights Realm production at Peter Sharp, the first-generation Nigerian-American author Mfoniso Udofia never directly explains the title, but implicitly she lets us know again and again and again.
From Ferguson, Missouri, to Charleston, South Carolina, communities are suffering the lethal consequences of our collective silence about racial injustice. The church should be a source of truth in a nation that has lost its way. As the dominant religion in the United States, Christianity is directly implicated when we Christians fail to speak more honestly about the legacy of racial inequality.
State officials in New York are reforming their policy of keeping people convicted of non-violent offenses in solitary confinement. Some hail the decision; others, including corrections officers, object, saying that solitary confinement is necessary to maintain control, and they say that keeping an individual in solitary confinement is not inhumane.
“The answer to this prayer would be to pay attention, to become aware, to be mindful, to develop a certain kind of consciousness
Where education and "dialogue" with lukewarm Christian "allies" continues to be a one-sided effort to which only LGBTQ Christians and a handful of outspoken allies contribute, perhaps it's time to recognize what Jesus taught in the parable of the sower.
Sojourners, a national Christian organization, is celebrating more than 40 years of faith in action for social justice.
Christians of the world are calling on our leaders to act. We are not asking for anything more than we know can be done. Join us in prayer at noon on Dec. 10 and together we can create a world in which the lowly are lifted up and the hungry are filled.
McQueen's unflinching revelation of Northup's struggle to maintain his dignity under the oppressive institution of slavery is a chance for Americans to engage the conversation we so desperately need -- the conversation about the "s" word -- "slavery."
Now, I'm a big fan of Jim Wallis and I appreciate that he moved the conversation away from Maher's attempted divisiveness and back to caring for the poor and immigration reform in this country. At the same time, I think the question Bill Maher was raising is an important one, too.