Sony Pictures Classics

Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer playfully quarrel about a Bach piece.
Gino DePinto, AOL BUILD #AOLBUILD presents Love is Strange where director Ira Sachs and actor John Lithgow will discuss the
Modestly successful in his lifetime, then relatively forgotten, Vermeer was rediscovered in the 19th Century. He has since become regarded as a grand master.
Julie Delpy and Richard Linklater began their creative collaboration in the mid-nineties on the beloved romantic classic "Before Sunrise." Now their collaboration continues with "Before Midnight," the third film in the unique series.
This week, The Israel Film Center Festival opens in New York City with over a dozen premiere Israeli films. Over the last decade, Israel has become a major international player in the world of film.
It may seem unimaginable to witness an event that brings together HIV and AIDS education in Africa, bone marrow transplants, celebrities and soccer for people of all ages. That's what happened, however, at LAFEST last Sunday.
Israel has quickly become an entertainment powerhouse that has given us In Treatment and the original Homeland, along with the two marvelous films that made the NYFF. We eagerly await the latest from Ari Folman. His Waltz with Bashir was also distributed by Sony Pictures Classics.
This is the least of Hollywood's worries, for my money. The major studios have a bigger problem -- such as the fact that they so seldom make movies with serious themes or content. And they never address actual political issues if they can avoid it.
French actress Marion Cotillard, who won the Best Actress Oscar for La Vie en Rose and will soon be seen in the summertime blockbuster, The Dark Knight Rises, is speaking out about an incident she experienced with a killer whale while filming on the set of Rust and Bone, a French import due in U.S. theaters this fall.
A Separation is not the story of a couple falling out of love, but a commentary on a society that has already lost its direction, and only lives in the opposing, inhuman corners of right and wrong.