"I feel like I’m still on the road," Amy Craton says. "I have more to learn."
Recently, my organization, College for America at Southern New Hampshire University, has been getting a fair amount of press about our recently announced partnership with Anthem, Inc.: Accredited college degree programs for 50,000 eligible workers, at no cost, if they want it.
Eighteen months away from the 2016 election, our national workforce and higher education policy arena already includes the campaign trail nearly as much as it does our nation's capital.
There has been lots of talk the past few years about the coming "disruption" in higher education. Technology, critics suggest, will present traditional colleges and universities with daunting challenges. Some have estimated that half will be forced to close their doors in the next 15 years.
Our educational outcomes -- particularly for lower-wage workers -- remain abysmal. And, our quality of life is suffering -- the Social Progress Index 2015 ranks the U.S. 16th in the world on that measure. And, yet, I see a glimmer of hope.
Colleges close and merge, but that this happened so quickly to a school of such standing was a disturbance of a different dimension. If Sweet Briar was a glimpse of one future for higher education, I got a look at an alternate future in Oakland.