Southern strategy

The director used her own documentary, "13th," to debunk the conservative conspiracy theorist's false claim that the GOP's "Southern strategy" was a myth.
Almost no one thinks of themselves as a bigot. But we all have at least some fear or hatred of others within us.
We live in an era of hatred and intolerance directed against those who do not conform to an increasingly archaic set of “norms
I feel blessed I see America through a more hopeful prism thanks to a gift presented to me at birth; my father's decision
While solving murders was difficult, especially with corrupt cops, the police could make quick work out of the impoverished people out front in the public's eye -- burnishing the credibility of both politicians and the NYPD at the same time.
During this Labor Day week, the traditional start date for fall presidential campaigns, the time is overdue for all Americans to wake up and fully recognize that this is no ordinary election, that one of the candidates represents an unprecedented threat to America, and just how extensive that threat is.
Few bemoaned Richard Nixon's "Southern Strategy," which allowed Republican candidates to build support in the South by appealing
"A convention of hangmen who subscribe to the principle that the executioner has his rights as well," says a famous writer
Hardly any politician does not extol his or her commitment to unifying the country while lamenting, sometimes in extraordinarily harsh language, the divisive nature of his or her opponent.
As long as the privileged aren't confronted with crime, poverty, economic deprivation or racism, it's far too easy to wash their hands of a responsibility all Americans should share, a more just society.
Whatever complaints one might have about the economic policies favored by Democrats over the last 50 years, no one outside the American Enterprise Institute and Paul Ryan's office seriously believes that Republican economics have been better for the white working-class.
As a Georgia voter, I apologize to the American people and to President Obama for the crass, mean-spirited speech given by Georgia United States Senator David Perdue to the Faith & Freedom Coalition's Road to Majority conference.
The election of a black President induced Republicans to throw gasoline on the racist kindling they've nurtured for decades. When democrats became the party of equal rights for blacks in the mid-sixties, racists sought a new home. They found it with Republicans.
The GOP has indeed been waging a war on women since the Reagan years. Campaigning against Hilary Clinton, Trump will amplify that contempt and make the GOP's misogyny cruder and more vile than any of us can imagine right now.
When asking ourselves the key questions - who is best placed to defeat Donald Trump in November, and who is best placed to pull the Senate back into Democratic control - many of us still believe that the answer is not Hillary Clinton. It is Bernie Sanders.
Although Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump hails from Queens, NY, his politics mirrors the Southern strategy where Republican Party candidates leveraged racism against African Americans to gain political support.
A rootie toot toot, A rootie toot toot. We are the boys from the Institute. We don't vote and we don't move and we don't mess with the donks who do. A rootie toot toot, A rootie toot toot. Trump got loose from the Institute. The inmate's out to rabblerout, and now we're screwed without a doubt.
The Soviet Union seemed permanent and invincible, until it didn't. When it fell, far more suddenly than anyone thought it would or could, the festering rot of decades was exposed to the world. We're seeing this happen, in real time, with the Republican Party.