space time

Whereas general relativity took a single genius (Einstein) a decade to create, that deeper theory -- known as a quantum theory of gravity -- has flummoxed generations of geniuses for a century.
We all are familiar with the force of gravity. But, where do the gravitational waves fit in the picture?
Consider: light travels at a speed of 186,000 miles per second (or 300 million meters per second), so if you're looking at
You've likely heard the saying: Looking out into space is the same as looking back in time. But what does that mean, scientifically speaking? It turns out that astronomers can observe stars and planets as they were in the past since it takes light quite some time to travel from those distant celestial objects all the way to Earth -- and the farther an object is, the longer it takes for the light to reach us. How is that even possible? HuffPost Science's Jacqueline Howard reports.
You've likely heard the saying: Looking out into space is the same as looking back in time. But what does that mean, scientifically speaking? It turns out that astronomers can observe stars and planets as they were in the past since it takes light quite some time to travel from those distant celestial objects all the way to Earth -- and the farther an object is, the longer it takes for the light to reach us. How is that even possible? HuffPost Science's Jacqueline Howard reports.
You've likely heard the saying: Looking out into space is the same as looking back in time. But what does that mean, scientifically speaking? It turns out that astronomers can observe stars and planets as they were in the past since it takes light quite some time to travel from those distant celestial objects all the way to Earth -- and the farther an object is, the longer it takes for the light to reach us. How is that even possible? HuffPost Science's Jacqueline Howard reports.
The prospect of making a discovery that would not only defy common sense but also overturn centuries of scientific thinking
It may come as a surprise that in modern physics, there exists a scale below which the very notions of length and space cease to exist. This is known as the Planck length, named after the German physicist Max Planck.
Liu and his team describe their findings online in Nature Photonics. The varying refraction index bends light in the same
What it comes down to, then, and what science helps us consider, is that there is an omnipotent, omnipresent force in the universe that creates everything we see, touch, taste and experience.