space weather

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By Geoffrey Reeves Space weather plays a role in national security too. If something goes wrong with a satellite, we need
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Just as a hurricane drives rain, wind, and floods, the space weather arising from a solar eruption can come in different forms. First comes the light from a solar flare, disrupting high-frequency radio communications more or less immediately.
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The sun is a stormy star that, across the centuries, has gifted our Earth with some incredible moments of calamity. Telegraph and radio technologies and even satellites and human safety have been placed in the breach of near-destruction. Is there a major "superstorm" in our future?
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Flares aren't harmful to humans on Earth but can cause disturbances in the atmosphere, where GPS and communications signals
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While the solar storm headed our way may affect power lines, radio transmissions, communication systems and satellites to
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According to the UK science minister David Willetts, who announced the new service, the increasing use of technology that
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The arrival of several other recent CMEs is imminent, however, so skywatchers at high latitudes should keep an eye out. The
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These waves disrupt satellite and terrestrial communications on earth on a weekly if not daily basis, according to University
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"If we can understand how the environment affects these satellites, and we can design to improve the satellites to be more
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The sun is currently at the maximum of Solar Cycle 24, but as this graph shows, there are far fewer sunspots during this
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Scientists have never actually seen snow fall on Venus, but they have observed metallic frost capping the planet's mountains
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The third CME in two days erupted toward Mercury on April 21, 2013. In this image, the sun is blocked so its brightness doesn’t
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The arcs give off a very specific wavelength of red light, but are too faint to see with the naked eye. They appear at lower
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"Even if the small-scale structures are different at both altitude levels, the overall morphology of the vortex is conserved
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Just how bad could it get? If it's anything like the so-called "Carrington event," pretty bad. That 1859 event -- considered
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NASA recently spent several million dollars on a telescope project that may help scientists better understand CMEs and other
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A new study summarizing Cassini observations of the giant Saturnian storm adds to a growing body of evidence demonstrating
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This composite image shows the sun's active region AR1654 (marked) compared to the sizes of the Earth and Jupiter. Image
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A huge explosion on the sun has flung a wave of solar particles toward Earth, an eruption that may amp up northern lights
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PP: One thing to remember is we’ve had the sun around for a long time. The difference now is we are a technological society