special interests

In the wake of the election, it wasn't shock based on pollsters' errors that got to me. Somewhere deep inside, I simply didn't believe that, of all countries on this planet, the United States could elect a narcissistic, celeb billionaire.
Sen. Richard Burr is under fire for being too close to industry groups, which spent more than $100,000 to send him around the world, a review shows.
The Republican nominee is refusing to disclose basic fundraising details that Clinton does and past GOP nominees did as a routine matter.
But first, we interrupt this program for a special alert for federal lawmakers and other public officials: Gift rules apply
Trump railed against his rivals for being bought by special interests. He's now cozying up to the same special interests.
Last week we met with a student who is applying to middle school. We wanted to get to know this sincere and funny 12-year-old boy. We asked him, "What do you like to do in your free time?" He looked to the ceiling and seemed at a loss on how to respond...
What makes the DNC's decision even more offensive and obtuse is the fact that a central and widely accepted platform of this entire election season is campaign finance reform, rejecting the use of corrupt money in politics, and overturning Citizens United.
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella will be sitting in the House gallery as an honored guest at the State of the Union (SOTU) address tonight. By all rights, he be should sitting before a Congressional committee instead, answering for his company's blatant tax avoidance.
The ongoing push to lift the ban on exports of U.S.-produced crude oil appears to be coming to a close, with Congress agreeing to a budget deal with a provision to end the decades-old embargo.
The controversy and clamor attached to the report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee would seem to suggest that something that radical had been proposed. But that's not quite the case.
When I finally owned what I am good at, I combined those soft skills with a hard skill (writing) and something I really care
In the House and Senate budget proposals for fiscal year 2016, passed with only Republican votes at the end of March, there are big winners and big losers. The big winners are defense spending and contractors and very wealthy people and powerful special interests. The big losers are children, our poorest group in America, and struggling low- and middle-income families.
Turn on the TV, and you'll be hard-pressed to find a news story about Americans uniting across ideologies. One idea, however, has risen above the fray to achieve practically unheard-of heights of public support. An incredible 97 percent of Americans agree: the time has come to end government corruption in America.
Netanyahu's speech may be evidence of hubris run amok on his part, but it is also a vivid illustration of the pervasive and destructive rise of partisanship in American politics over the last few decades.
Frank Underwood is known for deceiving people into acting against their own best interests. (We'll miss you, President Walker.) Now we learn that this trait may extend to the series which features him.
Fulbright already has his own website, Facebook page and Twitter account. The effort echoes a previous venture by comedian
Her remark is an apt credo for a party leadership that has spent the last quarter-century serving corporate power as persistently as it spews out empty rhetoric about "the needs of working families."