special needs kids

It was bittersweet watching my friend's daughter take her bow as one of the graduating seniors. Now that she is 21, she is ready to leave the safety of school and join the community as an active member.
I've never been comfortable using words that soften things. When my kids ask me a question, I give them the most honest answer that I think they're able to handle.
Kate has autism. She loves Ninja Turtles and kicking dirt. She loves her dog and just about everyone she meets. She's recently taken an interest in photography, and she'd like to share some of her photos with you. I think you'll be impressed.
"Look at that mother up there with that little blonde kid," barked the middle-aged woman in the red dress. "Who does she think she is? There isn't a thing wrong with that child!"
Without you, autism awareness is an exclamation without a point, or a balloon without enough air. It is lacking. Because without you, the breathtakingly unusual person in your life would simply drift -- it is you who keeps him or her or them afloat and buoyant.
Some days are going to be tough. You are going to fall into bed at the end of them and be amazed that you survived! But you will survive those days, and there will be so many wonderful, happy, love-filled days that will far outnumber the tough ones in the end.
Seven-year-old Ines Mitsouras has cerebral palsy. As her mom Melinda excitedly wrote in the comments for the ad, "The girl
The thing is, I can say with great certainty that if Archie had been a typical child, she would not have even looked twice. In fact, she may have even thought, too bad, punk. But because Archie has Down syndrome, in her mind, he needed to be let off the hook. Um, no.
There are times he comes out to tell you "the man helped me." With the sink, with the paper towels, with the door. Never a concern on his face. Never a problem breathed.
Voldemort is so freaking scary that if you even speak his name, all manner of horrors could rain down upon you. The kids at Hogwarts knew better than to mess with him because, just like we teach our kids in the real world, it's best not to talk about bad things.
If you think individuals and their families are just trying to game the system for their own benefit, think again.
In Jack's mind, you never lose friends, you just don't see them outside of your own mind as much as you used to. And to my son, that is the beauty of life. You just keep adding more and more friends. It never ends!
When you meet a kid with disabilities, talk to him, not just his parent. If he doesn't seem up for interacting, back off.
The only thing important in my imagined land is a person's heart. And his empathy. And his ability to find wonder.
You don't have to be a grown-up to advocate. You have to care about something and, most importantly, you have to act on it. So teach your children well. Get them involved in whatever issue is central to your life.
The truth is, the realities of raising a child with physical challenges are often not pretty, however lovingly they are handled.
As we sat in line waiting for our children to be let in to the Dinosaur Dig exhibit today, we shared knowing glances as our boys raised their hands in excitement and answered every question that the very patient narrator asked.
"This little old lady came out from behind the counter and took my shoulders, looked me in the eye, started crying, and said