Spinster

There are more than 124 million single Americans, by choice or chance, outnumbering those who are married. Clearly, the vision we have of the nuclear family, living with a white picket fence somewhere in suburbia, is outdated.
Until recently, the image we associated with the word "spinster" was fairly universal: a bottled-up woman in a high-neck shirt, hair pulled into a tight bun. So it was a good sign of progress when the term was discarded and replaced with "single woman."
6. Rachel McAdams There is unbelievable pressure on women to want marriage and children, and those who don't are considered
The Huffington Post spoke with Bolick about her new book, her "spinster wishes" and what it all means for today's 20 and
Let's face it: whether we have dogs, ferrets, birds or cats, we're all pretty crazy about our pets. So, why are women with cats commonly called "crazy cat ladies," as though they've just been branded with the scarlet letter?
Who would do such a thing? Spend months planning a picture-perfect wedding, only to leave her groom, cold, on the steps of the altar, after a speech announcing to the congregation why she did it? That person was me.
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Here's the real truth: Marriage and kids are not for everybody and we should all stop acting like they are.
Nix old maid... nix bachelorette... I'm going with spinster. It's archaic and has a certain ring to it. I think of Jane Austen and well-dressed, polite, independent women. Spinster is so out, it's in.
In our very modern society, a wife is held in high esteem, a divorcee gets credit for trying and people just feel sorry for the always-single woman who's never gotten a man to say "I do."