sports drinks

Parents, we are here to influence our children and guide them down a healthy path in life. We need to provide them with healthy choices at home, raise our voices to limit the marketing of unhealthy foods and drinks and provide opportunities for them to get off our couches and move.
Back when coconut water became a thing, marketers positioned it as a hydration powerhouse, claiming its natural sugar and electrolytes will hydrate better than water. While the nutrient composition of coconut water does resemble a lighter, more natural version of a sports drink, it may not deserve all of the hydration hype after all.
Parents usually have their kids' best interest in mind. They want them to grow healthy, acquire eating habits that promote wellness, and have beautiful, strong teeth. So how come kids are drinking so much sugar, an ingredient on the top of the list of foods to consume-less-of?
Runners have a contagious energy, an unusually positive outlook on life, and let's face it -- they look good in their spandex shorts. But, according to dentists and health professionals, runners and other endurance athletes are more prone to tooth decay and dental problems than the rest of the population.
OK, so you probably already know the basics of the Gatorade story, but just let's recap.
What's the message of these ads? That if you eat enough Chicken McNuggets you'll become a Olympian? That taking a bite of fast food is somehow as thrilling as receiving the highest athletic honor awarded on an international stage?