spring valley high school

The Justice Department said evidence was "insufficient" to prosecute.
"I am comfortable with people knowing I'm the girl who stood up," says Niya Kenny.
The school resource officer was not trained on how to work with children.
A Black female student's violent assault and arrest by a school police officer at Spring Valley High School in South Carolina has exposed a wider audience to the dangerous consequences of embedding police in schools.
This past summer, I read Atlantic Media journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates' new book Between the World and Me. To say it had a profound impact on me and the way I understand race relations in the U.S does not do the piece justice. I finished it with a dropped jaw.
All this exposure to police misconduct has caused me to be more compliant, hoping to avoid all police officers. I fear that I might encounter that out of control officer who is triggered just by the fact that I am a black woman with a sense of my own dignity.
It is important to remember that "they were asking for it" is used not only in instances of discipline. It is used in situations of abuse -- to defend the abuser.
Recent attempts to justify the horrific violence against black women and girls has me again returning to Sojourner Truth's question: "Ain't I a woman?" As a society we have to set a standard without compromises: Adult men should not beat, hit, pull the hair of or slam to the ground women and girls.
How could we get upset with students about electronic devices when we (teachers) did not follow proper etiquette while using them?