statins

People with obstructive sleep apnea are at significantly increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The relationship between the two conditions is complex, and the mechanisms by which they may trigger or exacerbate one another are not yet well understood.
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News However, some are concerned about this many people taking
Conventional wisdom tells us LDL cholesterol is bad and HDL cholesterol is good. A huge improvement from the days of "all cholesterol is bad," but still a far cry from adequate.
If you are taking a statin and experiencing symptoms of cramping, aching, fatigue or weakness, it's not in your head.
These promising new treatments are for individuals whose LDL cholesterol levels or cardiovascular risk profiles are not adequately addressed with statins, as well as those who are statin-intolerant.
"Will it help me live longer?" When patients ponder the lifetime commitment to a statin drug, this is the question they ask. But a very public controversy in the scientific community has recently diverted attention from this central question -- and that just might be on purpose.
The recent retraction of an academic claim in a leading journal about the incidence of side effects from cholesterol-lowering drugs has sparked anger in the medical community and potentially undermined public and patient trust.
Still the most feared of all diseases, cancer now has some good news. But the responsibility is yours to make sure you are one of the good statistics, not one of the bad ones.
This study leaves many questions unanswered: Would this supplement work as well for people who never had a heart attack, or
I believe, in the next 10 years, we're going to see a backlash against statins. In fact, we're starting to see it already. We're seeing now that they may not benefit everybody we thought they would. And we're seeing that there are some serious risks involved.