Steve Gleason

The passing of the Steve Gleason Act by Congress last week signals a major win for those living with ALS and touched me on a profoundly personal note as I recall the struggle my family faced in helping my uncle with the progressive, neurodegenerative disease find quality and affordable care.
She was around 20, when she received a new communication device, a sophisticated system that came with hundreds of short phrases, as well as an alphabet with word prediction software.
Epic punt-blocker, eight-year NFL veteran, ALS activist: Steve Gleason is both a symbol of recovery for Hurricane-ravaged
How we each can lift ourselves above the fray -- life's circumstances, negativity and excuses -- is the true message of Thanksgiving that I see. Because, if we're truly thankful, then we will know that our lives have a higher purpose, and our expression of gratitude is to live out that purpose.
On his part, Gleason, who was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease (also known as ALS) in 2011, says he accepts the hosts
As the segment's lack of intelligence and basic empathy produced a swift backlash, one of the hosts of the program that included
Having covered the event each year, Jane Seymour, who looked stunningly beautiful in an aqua gown, was noticeably reserved, but still poised, professional and direct during our interview just after she and James Keach posed for photos with guests and honorees.
With the Super Bowl around the corner, New Orleans is not only hosting the big game but also several fundraisers in its honor
Inside the question of whether gratuitous mayhem is a strategic element of pro football is a question of a different kind. It involves former Saints standout Steve Gleason and a filmmaker, Sean Pamphilon, who's making a documentary about Gleason's struggle with ALS.
2012-02-13-headinjurycarasanta.jpgOne thing all researchers agree on is that the types of head injuries sustained during football games can cause depression, changes in mood and behavior, memory loss, and even early dementia.
HuffPost Science Correspondent Cara Santa Maria discusses what happens to the brain of an athlete, such as a football player, when he/she receives repeated blows to the head.