stock markets

The fall in the Dow Jones has triggered a sell-off in global stock markets. Here are the reasons behind it - and what they mean for you.
Investors were apparently expecting Hillary Clinton would win.
With the U.S. Congress having just authorized funds to double the U.S. equity contribution to the IMF, one might expect that an American should be given a fair chance to get this key job. But, as things stand, no Americans need apply.
You've probably heard the advice to ride through market turbulence. That is good advice, but it needs to be repeated regularly because too many folks don't heed it - even people who should know better.
People may worry when a disease claims lives, but that worry doesn't make the disease's effects stronger or multiply the victim count. Investor sentiment, on the other hand, can and does cause market shocks to ripple outward.
Why is this bubble far worse than the tech bubble of 2000? Because the only thing worse than a market with collapsing valuations is a market with no valuations and no liquidity.
With the Fed likely to remain accommodative, bullish market sentiment may continue to overshadow concerns elsewhere. However, Cyprus has highlighted that we're far from an end to the crisis.
The possible loss of eagerly anticipated labour reforms, financial restrictions and market contagion provide shorter term sources of turmoil. However, existing reforms are likely to continue, market retrenchment is healthy and to be exploited for longer term opportunities.
"Traders on the floor are thinking, before the election President Obama wasn't able to resolve the fiscal cliff so what makes