Stonewall Uprising

Surviving protestors from the Stonewall riots look back on how the uprising began, 50 years later.
It’s not that I’m ashamed to be a lesbian; it’s more that I don’t really think of sexuality as a point of pride or shame.
Learn more at www.npca.org/stonewall and join the conversation online with #NatlParkForStonewall. Stonewall served as a spark
It does us all well to remember that the past is indeed "a foreign country" whose ways cannot be rewritten to line up with today's ever-changing political fashion. And in the country in which we now live, we "do things differently" with a freedom of which the past could never dream.
A pivotal moment in the history of the LGBTQ movement in America, it's gone from being a historical footnote for most, to being featured in an address by the President of the United States, to now being a critically reviled film by just about everyone.
While I sympathize with those calling for a boycott of Stonewall, I personally don't support a boycott. However, I don't think ANYONE should see Stonewall. Not because of its politics or revisionism, but because Stonewall is a terrible movie. Like really, really terrible.
The filmmakers may be scrambling in post-production to try to fix all of the issues people see with the film, but it's unlikely they will manage to fix the most egregious errors.
Danny was never able to forget what it meant to be a homeless teen. He overcame homelessness and built a good life for himself, but he bore the scars in his psyche, and in his body. He contracted hepatitis while he was homeless; it shortened his life.
If my gay colleagues choose to jettison ENDA, I'm willing to back off. But the question with which I am left is: Now what? Do we really expect that the House of Representatives, which won't even debate the version of ENDA with broad religious exemptions, will seriously consider a stricter amended one?
The dancing and partying was on at the Stonewall Inn when the raid and ensuing riots occurred the early morning of June 28, 1969, yet it was 38 years later in 2007 when I realized the historic significance of the uprising.
The fuse that was sparked 43 years ago still burns bright, and the gay rights movement still has many more hurdles to overcome. After a historic ruling for California this morning, I have more hope the other 37 states will sign on.
The president's words struck me to the core. Just as I became an accidental activist when I transitioned, I was an accidental participant in the Stonewall uprising when I stumbled upon the chaos when I was trying to attend a concert at the Village Vanguard on the night of June 28, 1969.
If too many are only willing to stand up against hate directed at ourselves and other members of our community, then we are not truly against hate or for social justice--we are merely for ourselves.
Hit the Wall, a powerful new play about the Stonewall Uprising produced by the relatively newbie theater company The Inconvenience, is one of those shows everyone in Chicago is talking about.
Filmmakers Kate Davis and David Heibroner have filled a cinematic void ignored too long. It took 41 years for the first non-fiction film to examine this innocuous raid that ignited a revolution.
While we grapple with such problems as whether the recently-out Sean Hayes is believable as a heterosexual in Promises Promises, it is good to remember this privileged debate is hard won.