Stop TB Partnership

The Russian leader's influence could signal a turning point in the fight against the world's top infectious killer.
The global political will to fight tuberculosis is snowballing.
Tuberculosis finally got some high-level political attention in this year's G-20 Leaders' Declaration.
Global health experts see an uptick in political will in the fight against tuberculosis.
If we as human beings really want to achieve something, nothing can stop us and we will do it.
One of the world's deadliest diseases is finally getting some global political attention.
"Nobody is safe from it," says South Africa's health minister.
It is reassuring to see a new determination to bring the very modern scourge of TB out of the shadows. But neglecting the real potential for faith engagement in the effort is a mistake. It is an engagement with an ancient history and a modern face, one that can bring out the best that faith communities have to offer.
Tuberculosis is not a disease of the past, since more than 5,000 people -- including at least 200 children -- die of TB every day.
I remember, about a decade ago, when I was one of these statistics: I fought and beat TB and ever since, have been an advocate