Now anyone anywhere can record their story about someone who made a meaningful difference in their life.
The simple act of listening to what someone is telling us is the most profound tool to carry on a memory of that person. Before technology, that is the only way people would honor the stories of those who came before them.
Their "baby bag" of hospital supplies sat in the corner, because I was due to make an appearance at any moment. As they drifted to sleep in each other's arms, they dreamed together about who I might be in the world.
Over the weekend, I was helping a friend sort through decades -- actually almost half a century -- belongings of a woman named Doris. I never met Doris. But I learned a lot about her life and personality by spending hours in her $130 a month rent controlled fourth floor walk-up.
Dave Isay, founder and president of the non-profit oral history project StoryCorps, long envisioned an initiative focused
For anyone under 30, it may be difficult to imagine a time when the gay-rights movement wasn't operating at a milestone-a-minute pace. Fortunately a wave of artistic and media projects has emerged to remind us of heroes past, to refocus us on the type of activism that helped elevate the LGBT movement and to inspire us to make that final push.