Strategic planning

The U.S. spent a record $306 billion on weather and climate-related disasters in 2017.
What These Facts Mean for Creatives One of the reasons why it is sometimes difficult to be a creative in today's world is
In leveraging large-scale events, specifically for those with a taste for the "foodie experience" the market has shifted. Costs have skyrocketed making it imperative that these events are successful.
I learned a lot of techniques on my journey, but the most important thing I learned, and in turn my readers learn, is a broad
The Executive Summary This should be written last, when the document is complete. The executive summary gives an overview
The war against violent extremism is not over but if freedom loving nation's and peoples of all faiths unite to oppose religiously-based oppression and tyranny, Paris provides hope that we are at a turning point.
By definition your Limiting Factor is the single biggest current constriction to growth, and hence it is a great leverage
The key here is to develop a balance that works for you, so that you are embracing the system and using it and not feeling confined by it. It's ok to allow yourself some flexibility as you move throughout your day!
Recently, a faculty colleague from another university asked if I thought it appropriate for the chief information officer to chair the university's strategic planning committee and would it not be more appropriate for a faculty member to be the chair.
3. Work with the right people. Data and data analysis are moving so fast that it makes sense to ally yourself with the right
As Fulton-Montgomery Community College begins the process of developing its next strategic plan (as our current plan ends at the conclusion of this academic year), I have been reflecting on the importance of a good plan for any organization.
Strategic leadership retreats are best when simple in design. Sometimes we outsmart ourselves creating complexity when a straightforward approach is better for the purpose at hand. With a clear roadmap it is much easier for everyone involved to pay attention and contribute.
Most serious business leaders would readily acknowledge the importance of developing a thoughtful strategic plan for their business. As Lewis Carroll put it in Alice in Wonderland, "If you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there." And that's not a very strategic way to run a business.
Spencer Stuart, an international placement firm, recently asked 500 directors who serve on for-profit boards to name the top factors that would reasonably improve their board experience. Their answers also resonate in the nonprofit arena.
Transforming your life involves going beyond the way you live, co-creating a better life for yourself, and changing the way you live. You do this by using your thoughts, visualization, words, faith, actions, or a combination of them.
The absence of a strategic planning process endangers a nonprofit's future growth and stability. Making that process a priority in nonprofit board operations involves selecting and training board members to appreciate its importance to the ongoing success of the organization.
In our line of work as management consultants, we're brought in from the outside and, at the outset, may have very little knowledge of a company's situation or its leaders.
Planning teams are invariably composed of very high-achievers with significant egos who hold strong opinions about all aspects of the business, its operating environment and each other.
There is a misconception of sustainability as solely an ecological related subject, which is not the case. On the contrary, there are a range of definitions and applications.
Strategic planning is essentially making the tough decisions on where to invest your business's resources (money, staff time, staff focus, customer attention) and where you won't invest your business's resources. Here are 10 tips to do it better.