stress-advice

Many women are abandoning the workplace relatively early in their careers -- mostly due to overwhelming levels of stress
Sweaty palms. Dry mouth. A throbbing heart. At some point, most of us have experienced these awful symptoms of stage fright. And we've all heard that deep-breathing and other techniques for calming down are best for reining in these symptoms.
The operative word here about stress is that it is a perception, also known as a thought or point of view. There are objective stressors, to be sure. But how these affect us determines our body's stress response.
The survival instinct designed to give us tools to fight or flee has turned on us. Now that it is on inappropriately, this response can have the opposite effect. Instead of saving our lives, it can contribute to insomnia, depression, panic attacks, and a host of other health concerns.
As a GPS for the Soul editor -- someone who reads, writes, Tweets and preaches about stress management all day -- I have my own tools that work when stress rears its repugnant head. But this doesn't mean I don't stress.
Worrying won't change anything, but staying positive just might. To do my part in the fight against all things stressful, here are a few I've given myself permission not to get so uptight about.
More often than not, we apply some emotional filter to our experiences and interactions, and these filters are a big part of what makes us stressed. It's not what happens to us that is inherently stressful, but how we respond to it that makes it stressful.
You can't avoid the 171 varieties of cheese at the grocery store, complex work situations, or the challenges of raising a family. What you can choose to do each day is only put yourself in situations where the stress is worth it.
Feeling stressed out about dating again after divorce? Don't sweat it! To help you navigate the dating world post-split, we've