stress health

New research finds that mindfulness practices have the potential to slash health care costs.
Everyone has the ability to increase resilience to stress. It requires hard work and dedication, but over time, you can equip yourself to handle whatever life throws your way without adverse effects to your health.
Your words and thoughts can guide you to creative solutions when challenges occur. Bringing mindfulness to the words you speak is an important aspect to creating a life truly worth living -- where you are not merely surviving, but really thriving.
The moment of the epiphany, the actual a-ha, brings immediate conceptual clarity and certainty in the mind. But to manifest that knowledge into changes in the physical and practical areas of one's life takes time, moves more slowly and is a continual and at times lengthy process.
As we head into the Labor Day weekend, many Americans are looking forward to some well-deserved time off and relaxation. From a health standpoint, nothing could be better, especially if you're one of those people who make a habit of burning the candle at both ends.
Chronic stress in general has been linked with a number of negative health issues, including poor sleep quality, depression
Additional sources: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/22/stress-attractiveness-women-face_n_3319682.html http://www.livescience.com
Having produced daytime TV for 17 years, I know from experience that people come on talk shows because they're in conflict with the way things are and are searching for answers. Those same reasons led me to mindfulness meditation.
When we let go of regrets we open up space within our being. This space then has the opportunity to bring creative endeavors into our lives. The present moment becomes realized as we release ourselves from the chains of the past.
Now in the healing process, and as an advocate for managing work stress in a conscious way, I wanted to share a few lessons that I learned. First, work-life flexibility and acceptance are the greatest keys moving forward when sudden acute health care issues arise.
There seems to be a trend here. Illness and stress. Spending wild amounts of money and stress. The culprit behind so many of our health problems is staring us in the face. Want to cut chronic diseases and health bills? Start with stress, the crisis at the heart of the health care crisis.
Learning to effectively cope with stress can not only help you feel better on a daily basis, but also protect your brain from the damaging effects of stress to preserve and maintain cognitive function throughout life. Here's how.
Identifying a food you react to can be more challenging, since it's possible to have reactions that occur one to two days after eating something. In addition, when we eat a food frequently, we often cannot recognize the symptoms it causes, since we're too used to them to identify them.
The question is: What we can do for our country and ourselves, not what the country can do for us. You woke up with a headache
Today, April 1, marks the beginning of National Stress Awareness Month, which means it's time to put some extra focus on
How does the heart relate to mindfulness? Mindfulness is about being present to what you're feeling, thinking and sensing. Connecting to our hearts enables us to be in "the heart of the moment," and if you don't want to get hooked into those thoughts and feelings, you let them pass through.
The survival instinct designed to give us tools to fight or flee has turned on us. Now that it is on inappropriately, this response can have the opposite effect. Instead of saving our lives, it can contribute to insomnia, depression, panic attacks, and a host of other health concerns.
Despite being a stage-five worrier, I try to keep my anxiety in its proper perspective. But after researching and writing a piece published earlier this week about what stress is doing to your body, I realized I still have a long way to go when it comes to handling the ever-present stress in my life.
Exactly what happens to your brain, heart, skin and muscles.